Daily Math Stuff for 05/20/2015

  • “Rayleigh–Bénard convection is a type of natural convection, occurring in a plane horizontal layer of fluid heated from below, in which the fluid develops a regular pattern of convection cells known as Bénard cells. Rayleigh–Bénard convection is one of the most commonly studied convection phenomena because of its analytical and experimental accessibility.”

    tags: m convection

  • “Pedro Reis, an engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, had long been interested in how things wrinkle. For example, a dimpled surface like that of a golf ball offers less air resistance than a smooth sphere. If a flying object could dimple or wrinkle on command, Reis thought, it could alter its own aerodynamics midflight.”

    tags: m mathematics wrinkles

  • “Now, as their train approached the city, Voevodsky pulled out his laptop and opened a program called Coq, a proof assistant that provides mathematicians with an environment in which to write mathematical arguments. Awodey, a mathematician and logician at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa., followed along as Voevodsky wrote a definition of a mathematical object using a new formalism he had created, called univalent foundations. It took Voevodsky 15 minutes to write the definition.”

    tags: m mathematics

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What I’m Reading on 05/20/2015

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What I’m Reading on 05/19/2015

  • “This course will run concurrently with the Turner Classic Movies “Summer of Darkness” programming event, airing 24 hours of films noir every Friday in June and July 2015. This is the deepest catalog of film noir ever presented by the network (and perhaps any network), and provides an unprecedented opportunity for those interested in learning more to watch over 100 classic movies as they investigate “The Case of Film Noir.””

    tags: bs film noir

  • “Part of this story is familiar to anyone who has watched public universities raise tuition and fees, in some cases by 50 percent or more. But there’s another, less obvious, part of the story. Many of the most elite public universities are steadily restricting the number of students who are allowed to pay in-state tuition in the first place.”

    tags: bs tuition

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What I’m Reading on 05/16/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/15/2015

  • “Data scientists and chief data officers are the hot hire these days, and government agencies at all levels are working to get more out of their rapidly growing troves of data. Determining how to approach all that data, however, can be daunting. “

    tags: m data science

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/14/2015

  • “In mathematics, bilinear interpolation is an extension of linear interpolation for interpolating functions of two variables (e.g., x and y) on a regular 2D grid.”

    tags: m interpolation

  • “Data scientists often come from diverse backgrounds and frequently don’t have much, if any, in the way of formal training in computer science or software development. That being said, most data scientists at some point will find themselves in discussions with software engineers because of some code that already is or will be touching production code.”

    tags: m software data scientists

  • “I recently started my third “real” job since finishing school; at my first and third jobs I have been a “data scientist”. I was a math major in college (and pretty good at it) and spent a year in the math Ph.D. program at the University of Virginia (and performed well there as well). These two facts alone would not have equipped me for a career in data science. In fact, it remains unclear to me that those two facts alone would have prepared me for any career (with the possible exception of teaching) without significantly more training.”

    tags: m data scientist math

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/13/2015

  • “Failure can happen for many reasons, however there are a few glaring dangers that will cause any big data project to crash and burn. Based on my experience working with companies and organizations of all shapes and sizes, I know these errors are all too frequent. One thing they have in common is they are all caused by a lack of adequate planning.”

    tags: m big data projects

  • “We are now at 20, up from 17. I hope I find the time to write a one-page survival guide for UNIX, Python and Perl. Here’s one for R. The links to core data science concepts are below – I need to add links to web crawling, attribution modeling and API design. Relevancy engines are discussed in some of the tutorials listed below. And that will complete my 10-page cheat sheet for data science.”

    tags: m tutorial data science

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What I’m Reading on 05/13/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/12/2015

  • Python has seen significant growth in utilization in the areas of data science and predictive analytics in both the corporate and academic worlds. The KDNuggets2014 poll of dominant languages in Data Science (http://www.kdnuggets.com/2014/08/four-main-languages-analytics-data-mining-data-science.html) puts Python second to R in languages used in data science. Over 1/3rd of data scientists in the poll acknowledge use of Python in their work. In this article, we will give a brief highlights on the utility of Python and its use in data science and predictive analytics.”

    tags: m python analytics data

  • “Next week, renowned scholars including three Nobel laureates and a Turing Prize winner will give lectures at Brown in economics, physics, computer science, and brain science. Speakers will reflect on what the future may hold for their disciplines, while emphasizing von Neumann’s vision of “computation as a scientific lens.” Fourteen von Neumann lectures will be given over four days, May 12-15, 2015. Each day’s session will include a “sweat box session”—an intensive question-and-answer forum with some of the day’s speakers.”

    tags: m nobel scholars computation future

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What I’m Reading on 05/12/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/11/2015

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What I’m Reading on 05/11/2015

  • “The bottom line: Whether your firm ends up with the Chief Data Officer or a Chief IoT Officer or both, a trend toward the creation of more chiefs may be on its way. “

    tags: bs iot chief officer

  • “The big problem is a lack of a well-understood tech stack — the layers of components or services that are used to provide software for the Internet of Things. This means that IoT developers are building top-to-bottom proprietary systems, with custom software, hardware, and communication layers. Until an IoT tech stack is codified and adopted, IoT will be hobbled by security issues, time to market challenges, and stability and reliability problems.”

    tags: bs iot tech stack

  • “With tide gauges distributed sparsely around the planet, scientists have turned to satellites to provide a global picture of sea level since the early 1990s. New research published on Monday in Nature Climate Change refines those satellite estimates and provides some good and bad news. The good news? Total sea level rise is lower than previous estimates. The bad news? Sea level rise rates are speeding up.”

    tags: bs sea level rise

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/09/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/08/2015

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What I’m Reading on 05/08/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/07/2015

  • “But as attractive as the big data space is, it can be a tricky sector for new entrepreneurs. Consider that 66 percent of all startups fail within the first 12 months. Though big data businesses may feel confident that they’re entering a hot space, stumbling blocks await. They need to be anticipated and considered.”

    tags: m challenges data startups

  • “Maxima is a system for the manipulation of symbolic and numerical expressions, including differentiation, integration, Taylor series, Laplace transforms, ordinary differential equations, systems of linear equations, polynomials, sets, lists, vectors, matrices and tensors. Maxima yields high precision numerical results by using exact fractions, arbitrary-precision integers and variable-precision floating-point numbers. Maxima can plot functions and data in two and three dimensions. The Maxima source code can be compiled on many systems, including Windows, Linux, and MacOS X. The source code for all systems and precompiled binaries for Windows and Linux are available at the SourceForge file manager.”

    tags: m maxima math software algebra

  • “Last year the Cuban government was interested in getting its hands on analytics software to process the data generated by visitors on social networks. The idea was to quickly identify problems at government-run hotels and tourist facilities.”

    tags: m cuba analytics data

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What I’m Reading on 05/07/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/06/2015

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What I’m Reading on 05/06/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/05/2015

  • “That’s why New York University’s Center for Data Science and NVIDIA are teaming up to develop next-gen deep learning applications and algorithms for large-scale GPU-accelerated systems.”

    tags: m nyu deep learning research

  • “As part of our ongoing series of interviews surveying the frontiers of machine intelligence, I recently interviewed Reza Zadeh. Reza is a Consulting Professor in the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University and a Technical Advisor to Databricks. His work focuses on Machine Learning Theory and Applications, Distributed Computing, and Discrete Applied Mathematics.”

    tags: m machine learning

  • “This course provides a broad introduction to machine learning, datamining, and statistical pattern recognition. Topics include: (i) Supervised learning (parametric/non-parametric algorithms, support vector machines, kernels, neural networks). (ii) Unsupervised learning (clustering, dimensionality reduction, recommender systems, deep learning). (iii) Best practices in machine learning (bias/variance theory; innovation process in machine learning and AI). The course will also draw from numerous case studies and applications, so that you’ll also learn how to apply learning algorithms to building smart robots (perception, control), text understanding (web search, anti-spam), computer vision, medical informatics, audio, database mining, and other areas.”

    tags: m machine learning

  • “With the advent of massively parallel computing coprocessors, numerical optimization for deep-learning disciplines is now possible. Complex real-time pattern recognition, for example, that can be used for self driving cars and augmented reality can be developed and high performance achieved with the use of specialized, highly tuned libraries.”

    tags: m optimization deep learning

  • “So, what if you need to program them yourself? What are the pitfalls? How do you draw them? What are the bounding boxes, how do you determine intersections, how can you extrude a curve, in short: how do you do everything that you might want when you do with these curves? That’s what this page is for. Prepare to be mathed.”

    tags: math bezier curves geometry m

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What I’m Reading on 05/05/2015

  • “All that is well and good – for people who don’t mind talking to strangers. But as an introvert, one of the situations I hate most is making small talk with people I don’t know. Here’s how I’ve managed to strike the balance between meeting new people – and being exposed to interesting new ideas – and not having to initiate awkward conversations.”

    tags: bs networking hbr

  • “For all its benefits, one aspect of open source software does cause headaches: understanding the legal terms that control its development and use. For starters, scores of licenses have been created that the Open Source Initiative recognizes as meeting the definition of an “open source license.” While the percentage of these licenses that are in wide use is small, there are significant and important differences between many of these popular licenses. Moreover, determining what rights are granted in some cases requires referring to what the community thinks they mean (rather than their actual text), and in others by the context in which the license is used. “

    tags: bs open source patent

  • “It is practically impossible to imagine any dashboard without graphs and charts. They present complex statistics quickly and effectively. Additionally, a good graph also enhances the overall design of your website. In this article, I will show you some of the best JavaScript libraries for graphs / charts. These libraries will help you create beautiful and customisable charts for your future projects.”

    tags: bs javascript charts

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/04/2015

  • “The more I use Python, the more I like it. Here is yet another example of why. I looked for Sudoku solvers written in Python and found quite a few. I particularly like the one Peter Norvig describes in Solving Every Sudoku Puzzle. As a matter of fact Peter wrote a constraint programming solver tailored to Sudoku. I recommend reading his blog entry if you want to learn Python. I also recommend it if you want to understand the basics of a constraint programming (CP) solver. Indeed, his CP solver is well designed, even if it only solves Sudoku.”

    tags: m sudoku python

  • “In this video, first in a series from IBM developerWorks, some of IBM’s prominent female technical leaders share their experience and insight on topics related to their work, careers, and current and future technologies.”

    tags: m technology women

  • “Of all the books that tackle these issues, Reinhart’s is the most succinct, accessible and accurate assessment of the statistical flaws that render many scientific studies suspect. Testing multiple hypotheses at once, on samples that are too small, using invalid tests, without specifying ahead of time how the data will be analyzed, are all a) very common practices and b) guaranteed to produce many wrong results. And as Reinhart astutely notes, virtually all the incentives in the scientific enterprise (such as getting published and getting tenure) encourage such bad practices and offer no rewards for people who want to do statistics right.”

    tags: m statistics wrong science

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What I’m Reading on 05/04/2015

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/03/2015

  • “Similarity is the measure of how much alike two data objects are. Similarity in a data mining context is usually described as a distance with dimensions representing features of the objects. If this distance is small, there will be high degree of similarity; if a distance is large, there will be low degree of similarity. Similarity is subjective and is highly dependent on the domain and application.”

    tags: m similarity measures python

  • “Welcome to the fascinating world of the recommendation engine- this post will walk through the concepts, and later posts will teach you how to implement your own.”

    tags: m recommendation engines

  • “In 2010, French mathematician Cédric Villani received the Fields Medal, the most coveted prize in mathematics, in recognition of a proof which he devised with his close collaborator Clément Mouhot to explain one of the most surprising theories in classical physics. Birth of a Theorem is Villani’s own account of the years leading up to the award. It invites readers inside the mind of a great mathematician as he wrestles with the most important work of his career.
    But you don’t have to understand nonlinear Landau damping to love Birth of a Theorem. It doesn’t simplify or overexplain; rather, it invites readers into collaboration. Villani’s diaries, emails, and musings enmesh you in the process of discovery. You join him in unproductive lulls and late-night breakthroughs. You’re privy to the dining-hall conversations at the world’s greatest research institutions. Villani shares his favorite songs, his love of manga, and the imaginative stories he tells his children. In mathematics, as in any creative work, it is the thinker’s whole life that propels discovery–and with Birth of a Theorem, Cédric Villani welcomes you into his.”

    tags: m french mathematics

  • “Villani has been called the Lady Gaga of French mathematicians. After winning the Fields Medal, math’s highest honor, in 2010, for what his award citation called “proofs of nonlinear Landau damping and convergence to equilibrium for the Boltzmann equation,” he embraced a role that many other medalists have dreaded—that of mathematical ambassador, hopscotching from event to event and continent to continent, evangelizing for the discipline.”

    tags: m french mathematics

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What I’m Reading on 05/03/2015

  • “When confronted with a tangle of spindly clematis vines to prune, many gardeners get no further than scratching their heads and wondering where to begin. The confusion is most likely caused by the specific pruning needs of the many species and varieties. Some clematis vines like to be cut to the ground each year. Others just need a simple shearing to keep them looking good. But how do you know what kind of pruning a clematis needs? The key to success is figuring out which of the three pruning groups your clematis belongs to. By identifying the group and following the instructions, the task will seem much less daunting.”

    tags: bs gardening clematis

  • ” Warning of an “innovation deficit,” scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say declining government spending on basic research is holding back potentially life-saving advances in 15 fields, from robotics and fusion energy to Alzheimer’s disease and agriculture. “

    tags: bs science spending u s decline mit

  • “The raywenderlich.com Tutorial Team is known for making the highest quality tutorials available online. It’s awesome how far we’ve come, but we think we can do even better!”

    tags: bs ios android unity authors editors

  • “Pattern matching is a staple of functional languages. At its core, Swift is primarily an object-oriented language, like Objective-C is. However, there are many advantages to the way more functional style languages like Haskell and Erlang do things that the designers of Swift decided to include. Pattern matching in particular, saves us having to type much longer, and less readable statements to do the same checks.”

    tags: bs swift pattern matching

  • “You can’t judge a book by its cover, or a Linux by its interface. If you glance at Ubuntu 15.04, Vivid Vervet, you won’t see a lot different from Ubuntu 14.10. Don’t let first impressions fool you. Underneath that slick Unity 7.x interface, there’s a lot of changes.”

    tags: bs ubuntu

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Daily Math Stuff for 05/02/2015

  • “Taking advantage of these opportunities isn’t easy. It requires a tight interlock between knowing the business problem worth tackling and the technical skills to actually tackle them – data, technology and algorithms.”

    tags: m quants

  • “SymPy is a Python library for symbolic mathematics. It aims to become a full-featured computer algebra system (CAS) while keeping the code as simple as possible in order to be comprehensible and easily extensible. SymPy is written entirely in Python and does not require any external libraries. “

    tags: m python algebra mathematics sympy

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What I’m Reading on 05/02/2015

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What I’m Reading on 05/01/2015

  • IBM scientists unveiled two critical advances towards the realization of a practical quantum computer. For the first time, they showed the ability to detect and measure both kinds of quantum errors simultaneously, as well as demonstrated a new, square quantum bit circuit design that is the only physical architecture that could successfully scale to larger dimensions.”

    tags: bs ibm quantum

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What I’m Reading on 04/28/2015

  • Drupal’s modular setup allows for different datastores to be integrated as modules, this allows sites to store different types of Drupal data into MongoDB. You can choose to store Drupal’s cache, session, watchdog, block information, queue and field storage data in either a standalone MongoDB instance or in a MongoDB Replica Set in conjunction with MySQL as the default datastore. If you’re looking at clustering your entire Drupal setup, then see this blog on how to cluster MySQL and the file system.”

    tags: bs configure drupal mongodb

  • “OpenSpecimen is an open source biobanking informatics platform that permits users to enter and retrieve data concerning the collection, storage, quality assurance, and distribution of biospecimens. Its most important feature is the ability to collect high-quality, standards-based data specific to a disease or set of study requirements.”

    tags: bs open source

  • “In January 2015 IBM introduced the z13 microprocessor, which is regarded as the world’s fastest. Speed is important, but as any devotee of Moore’s Law knows, it’s pretty transitory. So in a world of ever-quicker chips, why does z13 matter? To cop a phrase from the radio waves, it’s all about the analytics.”

    tags: bs ibm processor z13

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What I’m Reading on 04/21/2015

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What I’m Reading on 04/17/2015

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What I’m Reading on 04/07/2015

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What I’m Reading on 04/05/2015

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What I’m Reading on 04/03/2015

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What I’m Reading on 03/23/2015

  • “Several people have asked me for advice about education and training in Analytics and Data Science, so I wrote this article. For our purpose here, I include Analytics, Data Mining, and Data Science degree program, certificate, training, and certification programs. This information is readily available on the internet, but I have picked some of my favorites here–so the list is not all inclusive. I am not affiliate with any of these programs other than as a guest speaker.”

    tags: bs online education analytics

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What I’m Reading on 03/10/2015

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What I’m Reading on 03/06/2015

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What I’m Reading on 03/05/2015

  • “Few technologies have generated more attention than virtual reality, which promises to immerse people in 3-D games and video. Yet for the last couple of years, the companies building virtual reality headsets have begged for patience from content creators and the public. The companies’ biggest concern: that unpolished virtual reality products could make people physically sick.”

    tags: bs v virtual reality nausea

  • “When creating new mobile applications, developers all too often forget taking the few additional steps to make their programs usable for those with disabilities. Now, IBM offers a free testing tool to ensure mobile applications are useable to the one billion people worldwide with disabilities, such as people with visual or auditory impairments. The checks are also good for ensuring the app can be used by the world’s growing elderly population.”

    tags: bs ibm mobile accessibility guidelines

  • “IBM Watson, the artificial intelligence platform made famous by beating the three best Jeopardy! champions ever several years ago, bought Denver-based AlchemyAPI today. It did not reveal the purchase price. The acquisition gives Watson a key piece of machine learning technology. The deal also gives it access to community of over 40,000 AlchemyAPI developers, who are building cognitive apps, which IBM defines as “systems that learn and interact naturally with people to extend what either humans or machine could do on their own.””

    tags: bs IBM Watson AlchemyAPI

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What I’m Reading on 02/10/2015

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What I’m Reading on 02/05/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/27/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/26/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/21/2015

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The value of rotational assignments

What’s the best way to get a broader view of what happens in a company, an organization, or an industry? Certainly you can read a lot, and you must do this. However, actually working in a different area teaches you about what is and is not being handled well, how that area relates to others, how to maneuver the politics, and helps you build your network of professionals in a concrete way. While “connecting” online is good, it is even better to work side-by-side with someone.

From a management perspective, employees who have this broad experience are more valuable because they can both be domain experts and understand the big picture. One way of getting this is by supporting rotational assignments.

There are several ways of doing this. One is that an employee starts in your group and then moves to another, and then another, and another, until he or she settles into an appropriate business or technical leadership role. Here people “rotate out” but do not necessarily rotate back in. I rotated out of IBM Research in 1999 and “rotated” back 13 years later. I’m not sure that was part of anyone’s career plan for me, including my own.

An individual can do this by changing companies. If they hope to return to one of them, it is important not to burn bridges. Don’t leave in a huff if you expect to ever be hired there again. You may not think that will ever happen, but why take the chance?

A more controlled program would have someone in your group go work for another team for 3 to 12 months and then come back. After their return, their responsibilities should expand to take advantage of their new skills and connections. They should also actively share their new knowledge and insights with their co-workers. Perhaps a year later, they can rotate out to another role or just move on. Don’t forget to reconsider their salary when they first return to you.

For management, you must guarantee that the employee has a round-trip ticket to and from the other organization. It is not cool to tell the person that there is no headcount allocation for them when they are ready to come back. Yes, times change, but you are breaking a promise to someone who you supposedly thought had a lot of value. If they cannot come back, you have lost trust and credibility. Don’t be surprised if the employee quits and joins another company. Don’t be surprised if no other employees take you up on your offers of “career-expanding rotational assignments.”

For the employee, you also made a promise. You said you would come back and make your original group stronger. You don’t have to spend the rest of your life there, but your management and colleagues were expecting to have your expanded expertise, at least for a while. However, if your staying in the new organization makes the overall company stronger, you may be able to make that argument. In any case, be gracious and make it a negotiation, not a demand.

A sequence of assignments where a person “visits” different parts of a company can be a win-win for the manager and the employee. This is an important part of career planning. For you as an employee, remember that you are ultimately responsible for your job path within and between companies. Be active about it and consider suggesting a rotation to your manager.

What I’m Reading on 01/20/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/19/2015

  • “The Echo is one of the most compelling cases I’ve ever seen for the power of voice control, of talking to our gadgets the way we talk to each other. It’s also a powerful and infuriating reminder of its limitations, of how long the road to our robotic future really is. Alexa’s going to turn out just fine, I think, but she’s got some growing up to do.”

    tags: bs amazon echo

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Let’s Drop the “Embarrassing Moment” Interview Question

I was speaking with a friend who had a job interview last week, and he mentioned that he had gotten the “Please tell us about your most embarrassing moment” question. Please? They couldn’t do better than that?

In Amy Poehler’s new book Yes, Please, she gives the advice that you do not have to tell anyone about your most embarrassing moment. It is none of their business, and you need not and should not have to confess to anything just to move on in the interview process. I agree with Amy.

It is especially strange that people are warned not to immortalize their immature or questionable behavior on Facebook or Twitter, only to have job interviewers ask them about such behavior. Rather than giving useful information about applicants, it seems to me that it satisfies some sort of voyeuristic intent by the interviewers. It is not even a constructive question.

If I were interviewing a software developer, I might instead ask about how they discovered a bad bug in some code, how they fixed it, and how they helped ensure that it did not happen again.

If I were speaking to a sales person, I might ask about a sale they expected to close but did not, why that happened, and what they learned about the experience to help avoid such a surprise again.

If I were talking to a potential student summer intern, I could ask them how a challenging college class altered their approach to their studies, and how that might be reflected in their work with us.

So it is ok to admit that bad things have happened to or around us in our professional lives, but keep it at that–professional–and avoid the personal questions. What is interesting is how the applicant dealt with the situation, what they learned, and how that could make them a good employee for you.

There are many factors to consider in applicants like experience, skills, enthusiasm, honesty, and personality, but keep your nosy personal questions to yourself!

Also available on LinkedIn.

What I’m Reading on 01/17/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/13/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/12/2015

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What I’m Reading on 01/08/2015

  • “In this article, I want to take a closer look at how strings are handled in Swift. I see this as a follow-up to a piece titled NSString and Unicode that I wrote for objc.io a while ago. Please refer to that article for a more thorough explanation of the Unicode features I mention below. I also assume that you have read the chapter on Strings and Characters in Apple’s Swift book.”

    tags: bs strings swift developers

  • “We looked at data provided by the site, which aggregates reviews of jobs and companies, that ranks tech jobs according to how many employees thought business was improving in 2014 to explore which could be next year’s best bets. According to Dobroski, big data, mobile and privacy are going to be “very hot and very popular” in 2015.”

    tags: bs developers designers data jobs

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2015 is Not the Year of Big Data, Big Data Was and Is Here to Stay

It’s the beginning of a new year and we’re being flooded with predictions, retrospectives, and catchy headlines to make us read articles about our favorite topics. One that I have seen more than once is “2015: The Year of Big Data.” I thought 2013 and 2014 were the Years of Big Data! I’m pretty sure that 2016 and 2017 will also be the Years of Big Data.

Click-bait headlines aside (and I’m guilty of it above), Big Data and the infrastructure that supports it and the mathematical analytics that makes sense of it have been producing great descriptions, prescriptions, and optimizations for years. Short of an electromagnetic pulse that will cause us to restart everything someday, Big Data is here to stay. How will things evolve?

First, there will be more data. I take a very Platonic view of data in the sense that whether or not we collect it, it is out there. The amount of sunlight that hits every blade of grass or soybean plant is real, though we don’t measure it all and we don’t therefore have it in some file or database somewhere. We will collect and store more data once we understand why we need it and how to get it.

Second, raw data can be messy and hard to use. We’ll continue to devise ways to clean it up, filter it, compute the missing bits, align overlapping patches of information, and determine metadata that simplifies gaining insights. We’ll figure out more efficient ways of storing the information and invent new kinds of databases. We’ll drastically speed up the time from when we first learn of data’s existence to when we are computing with it and gleaning useful understanding.

Next, we’ll build better and more sophisticated models using this managed data to understand additional kinds of systems and the interconnections among them. We’ll devise more and better algorithms to get more accurate predictions and optimizations, faster. This is the way science works: we build on what we know and have the occasional breakthrough that allows us to do things in new and improved ways or, in some cases, for the very first time.

Finally, this will be translated into more information we can use in practical ways in our personal and professional lives. It will also improve our entertainment and how we read, listen, watch, and engage in sports.

As evidence of how Big Data has been around for a while, sabermetrics, the statistics and analytics of baseball, was being done on computers in the 1960s. We have more data now and better mathematics, but we are seeing an evolution that is expanding and gaining momentum. This is not a statement limited to baseball.

If you are now starting to look into Big Data, good, but get grounded quickly on what it can and cannot do for you. Big Data is just becoming the way we do things. 2015 will be a very good year for Big Data, I agree, but make it great for you and your organization. Whether or not you realize it, it is the basis for how music and movies are recommended to you, how retailers market to you, and increasingly how health treatments are determined for you.

Turn this around and employ Big Data and analytics to make smarter decisions. That doesn’t sound like a new idea for 2015, does it?

This blog entry is also available on LinkedIn.

What I’m Reading on 01/06/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

What I’m Reading on 01/02/2015 – Big Data Predictions Edition

No endorsements of any of these by me, but a roundup of what people think will happen in 2015. It’s always a good idea to subtract “my company, product, or open source project interests” from so-called objective predictions.

  • “Goldman Sachs has taken the lead with a $15 million investment in big data analytics start-up Kensho. A number of senior changes in Deutsche Bank’s corporate banking and securities business relate to a new approach to customer data analysis. And BBVA’s acquisition of Spanish big data analytics start-up Madiva in December shows how this approach is continuing to be applied in corporate and retail banking to speed-up previously time-consuming tasks, from valuing portfolios of assets to approving mortgages for clients.”

    tags:bs big data

  • “If 2014 was the year that enterprises desperately tried to take off the Big Data training wheels, 2015 will be the year they succeed. Ironically, this won’t be because they master the intricacies of Hadoop and Spark. Instead, it will be because 2015 will be the year we stop trying to make every data problem into a Hadoop problem and instead use the right tool for the job.”

    tags:bs big data

  • “Thus, 2014 was the year when pilot projects went into production, or when small production projects went large scale. As a result, the infrastructure of Hadoop did a lot of growing up this past year. Projects were able to take on larger problem spaces as well, thanks to the release of YARN in 2013. With a year to work with the now generally applicable job- and task-scheduling systems in Hadoop, developers working at the Apache Foundation (and inside companies like Hortonworks, Cloudera and MapR) were able to quickly ramp up projects that use YARN, like Apache Tez, Apache Hama and management system Apache Ambari.”

    tags:bs big data

  • “The question all enterprises need to ask themselves is this: How are we going to harness all this information, and do it efficiently, so that the IT we use pays us dividends?”

    tags:bs big data

  • ” In 2015, we’ll see the impact of big data across almost every industry sector, and there will be a multitude of proof points that go beyond vague claims often seen today.”

    tags:bs big data

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

What I’m Reading on 01/01/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

What I’m Reading on 12/29/2014

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Bob Dylan

  • “After months of rumors, Bob Dylan has finally announced the details of his upcoming record Shadows in the Night. Produced by Dylan under his longtime pseudonym Jack Frost, the album features 10 songs popularized by Frank Sinatra, including “Autumn Leaves,” “Some Enchanted Evening,” “The Night We Called It a Day” and “I’m a Fool to Want You.” It hits stores on February 3rd, 2015, but is now available for pre-order.”

    tags:bs Bob Dylan music sinatra

  • “It’s anyone’s guess what changed over the past few months, but at the final performance of his five-night stand at New York’s Beacon Theatre – his amazing 91st show of the year – Dylan sounded magnificent. He was expressive, clear, articulate, intensely focused and visibly pleased. Without a doubt, it was the most enjoyable Dylan concert in recent memory.”

    tags:bs Bob Dylan music

Analytics / Cognitive

  • “Big Blue isn’t playing small ball with that claim. It has opened a new IBM Watson Global Headquarters in the heart of New York City’s Silicon Alley and is investing $1 billion into the Watson Group, focusing on development and research as well as bringing cloud-delivered cognitive applications and services to the market. That includes $100 million available for venture investments to support IBM’s ecosystem of startups and businesses building cognitive apps with Watson.”

    tags:bs ibm watson

  • “Spam filtering, face recognition, recommendation engines — when you have a large data set on which you’d like to perform predictive analysis or pattern recognition, machine learning is the way to go. This science, in which computers are trained to learn from, analyze, and act on data without being explicitly programmed, has surged in interest of late outside of its original cloister of academic and high-end programming circles.”

    tags:bs open source machine learning

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.