What I’m Reading on 09/24/2014

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What I’m Reading on 09/19/2014

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What I’m Reading on 09/16/2014

  • “Watson Analytics is a cloud application that does all of the the heavy lifting related to big data processing by retrieving the data, analyzing it, cleaning it, building sophisticated visualizations and offering an environment for communicating and collaborating around the data. And lest you think that IBM is just slapping on the Watson label because it’s a well known brand (as I did), Eric Sall, vp of worldwide marketing for business analytics at IBM  says that’s the not the case. The technology underlying the product including the ability to process natural language queries is built on Watson technology.”

    tags: bs ibm watson analytics

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What I’m Reading on 09/11/2014

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What I’m Reading on 09/10/2014

  • “Besides listing in a concise way all the changes that each Xcode beta version brought to Swift, the repo also collects some change requests that have been discussed either in Apple developers forums, or reported to Apple through Radar. A few highlights of areas where Swift might see further development beyond 1.0 are: abstract methods, access control, C++ support, nil returning initializers, and others, though there is not any commitment on Apple part, yet.”

    tags: bs apple swift language

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What I’m Reading on 09/07/2014

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What I’m Reading on 09/05/2014

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What I’m Reading on 09/03/2014

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Early impressions of Swift, and some workarounds

I’ve been playing around with Swift, the new programming language from Apple, for a few days and I’ve been quite happy with it. I’ve used many languages and development environments since I started coding when I was 15, so I was anxious to see what Swift offered.

I’ve by no means used all the features yet, though I’ve read about most of them in Apple’s online language guide and reference. I’m using XCode 6 Beta 6, so I expect that some of the gotchas and incomplete implementations will be addressed in the next beta or the final version. Even after that I would expect the language to evolve further since most do.

Some of the things I like:

  • Clean syntax
  • Fast compilation, when it works (see below)
  • Garbage collection
  • A nice attempt at bringing the power of older languages like C++ into a more modern form that includes some features resembling those in Python
  • A simple way to override syntactic operators like addition, negation, and multiplication.

My plan of attack here has been to take some C++ code I wrote 5 years ago and translate a subset of it to Swift. That way I can see how I would translate the ideas and structure into the new language. It’s been a good way to learn the language.

Some observations:

  • Passing by reference and passing by copy are clearly distinguished with less syntax than C++.
  • Because of the way it treats Unicode in a first class way, working with strings is more awkward than in many other languages. The need for Swift to coexist with Objective-C is also part of the reason, I believe.
  • The automatic garbage collection reduces code size over my previous manual methods.
  • I’m being more meticulous about when I can destructively change an object. (Almost never, and only close to where I create the object using specific init functions.)
  • I’m looking forward to a larger collection of standardized collection types. Here I would expect a huge improvement over the Standard C++ Library.
  • Once my core translated subset is complete and working well, I’ll look at using more of the idiomatic features of Swift and optimizing the code.

While working in the XCode editing environment, I hit a point where the computer CPU usage shot up to close to 100% for SourceKit, the underlying code base that handles all the editing, syntax checking, and code issue finding. Editing slowed to a crawl and sometimes I would get a message that SourceKit had crashed. Compilation took many minutes but the execution was correct.

I looked around the web, especially on StackOverflow, and found other mentions of the behavior but no great solutions and no problem situation that matched mine exactly. Eventually I went old school: I commented out most of my code and selectively added it back in until I could isolate the offending lines. Note that this was not a runtime error but an environmental problem while editing. That is: not my real problem.

If I had done something syntactically wrong, the editor or the compiler should have told me and not sucked up all the resources on my computer. If I was not doing something wrong, I should have seen no slow down.

Eventually I found that the offending code was

var s : Int = (u.bigits[j] * b + u.bigits[j-1] - q * v.bigits[n-1]) * b + u.bigits[j-2]

There is nothing wrong with the code except perhaps its complexity. I broke the statement into several simpler ones. By the way, I know I could have used “+=" but I wanted to be explicit and mirror the original statement.

var s : Int = -q * v.bigits[n-1]
s = s + u.bigits[j-1]
s = s + u.bigits[j] * b
s = s * b
s = s + u.bigits[j-2]

The problem went away. Editing and compilation speed returned to normal.

So the moral of this is that when working with betas of new languages, expect a few glitches and work around them. In the next release of XCode I’ll try my original statement and see if it has been fixed.

I’m looking forward to trying the new generics and constraints features. Though they look new to Swift, the ideas go back to at least the early 1990s.

Two other tidbits:

  1. If you know the type of an object, it does not hurt to be explicit in stating it. While it could be inferred, stating it makes the code more self-documenting.
  2. This release does not like spaces between unary prefix operators and their operands. That is, “- x” is flagged while “-x” is not. We’ll eventually see if this is a bug or a feature.

What I’m Reading on 08/28/2014

  • “Experiences like those two are becoming common at campuses around the country, as students are showing up the universities that trained them by producing faster, easier-to-navigate, more informative and generally just better versions of the information systems at the heart of undergraduate life.”

    tags: bs apps colleges

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What I’m Reading on 08/27/2014

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What I’m Reading on 08/25/2014

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What I’m Reading on 08/07/2014

  • “One of those is the possibility to use Swift as a general OS “scripting” language – instead of bash, PyObjC or C or any other option that you might have opted for in the past. Moreover, you can do that entirely from outside of XCode – so write your Swift program in any editor and then simply use Terminal to execute it, as if it was pure script.”

    tags: bs swift

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What I’m Reading on 08/01/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/27/2014

  • “The Ruby language is 21 years old. Its strong community and adoption by the open source community has kept this language steady and improving. Ruby has changed drastically over the years. It has grown from a young child to the strong adult that it is today. But it didn’t get that way overnight. Let’s take a look at the life of the Ruby programming language.”

    tags: bs history ruby

  • “Enter Scrivener.  This program, produced by a company called Literature and Latte, was designed specifically for writers who are writing long documents like novels and movie/play scripts.  It is available for Windows, Mac, and LInux, and comes with a thirty day free trial. I have been using Scrivener to write my novels for about a year now, and I have to say it has made writing my novel sooooo much easier.”

    tags: bs novel writing scrivener

  • “One of the first things we like to talk about when you’re going to learn how to get into a kayak is keep in mind that more people tip over at the dock – getting either in or out – more than any other place on the water itself. We have a tendency to be overconfident about the fact that we should be able to get into a kayak with no problem.”

    tags: bs kayak dock

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What I’m Reading on 07/26/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/24/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/22/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/16/2014

  • “This page attempts to collect information and links pertaining to the practice of AI and Machine Learning in python.”

    tags: bs python AI

  • “This app ranks the popularity of dozens of programming languages. You can filter them by listing only those most relevant to particular sectors, such as web or embedded programming. Rankings are created by weighting and combining 12 metrics from 10 sources. We offer preset weightings for those interested in what’s trending or most looked for by employers, or you can take complete control and create your own custom ranking by adjusting each metric’s weighting yourself. “

    tags: bs programming languages ieee

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IBM and Apple mobile announcement: important links

Yesterday IBM and Apple made an important announcement about partnering to significantly growth the use of mobile via Apple devices in the enterprise. That is, the collaboration will significantly increase the functionality and value that mobile brings to people in their jobs.

Here are some of the most important links about this announcement.

What I’m Reading on 07/15/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/13/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/11/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/10/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/09/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/07/2014

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What I’m Reading on 07/03/2014

  • “Maxima, a full featured computer algebra system, now runs on your Android mobile devices. Maxima, and its predecessor Macsyma is one of the most long-established software in the world, back in 1960s at MIT LCS and Project Mac. You can perform many many math operations such as integration, differentiation, matrix operations, rational numbers, symbolic treatment of constants such as pi, e, euler’s gamma, symbolic and numerical treatment of special functions such as sin(x), cos(x), log(x), exp(x), zeta(s), and many more.”

    tags: bs android maxima

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On tools

Having a collection of fewer high quality tools is better than having many cheap, inaccurate ones that won’t last long and may be dangerous.

When I was young, I couldn’t afford very good tools. I’m not talking about software here, I’m referring to things like power saws and kitchen pots. I bought them as I needed them, but they were never top end. Over time, I replaced them all.

The problem with cheap tools is that they often do not work very well and they don’t last very long. Other than that, they’re great! (grin) Inexpensive screwdrivers twist and lose the shape of their tips, for example.

Take the power saw. Cheaper models do not have the power and often the precision to do the job right. Yes, they may be better than a hand saw but your work may be sloppy and inaccurate. That hand saw? Cheaper models may not be made of high quality wood and the metal may be be too thin, so it will wobble when you make a cut. It will likely dull faster as well.

In the kitchen, inexpensive knives will also dull quickly and may end up being downright dangerous. With any tool, cheap or otherwise, you need to know how to use it safely so that it will at least not be ignorance that caused the nicked finger, knuckle, or worse.

So while it is nice to say “buy better, more expensive tools,” that doesn’t solve the problem of affordability. Borrowing tools may work, but better from a relative than a friend. Better yet is having a skilled relative with good tools to help you!

Plan your strategy of getting good tools over time, and spend more sooner on the really important things you need. Start by thinking about what you will be using frequently.

For household work, construction, and carpentry, spend extra as soon as you can on screwdrivers, pliers, and tape measures. You can do a lot with an accurate electric saber saw and a square. Get the best quality cordless drill and drill bits you can afford.

For cooking, begin with the knives. You don’t need many of them, just a few very good ones. Don’t splurge on measuring spoons and cups since inexpensive ones are often good enough. Get a good Dutch oven sooner rather than later. Favor fewer stick-free pots and pans with new, high quality coating rather than a set of cheap pots. Sets can be cheaper, but you can also build up your collection piece by great piece as you have the money.

As a final suggestion, tools often come in three price ranges: inexpensive, moderate, and very expensive. If you know nothing else, go for the moderately priced tools. That said, do your research.

What I’m Reading on 07/01/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/30/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/26/2014

  • “Back in the day, I used to look at a recipe that called for boiling something destined for the grill and think “What? Why cook it twice? Will there be any flavor left?” The answer for many foods turned out to be a resounding “Yes.” Parboiling can actually add flavor, plus speed your grilling time, reduce flare-ups and increase moisture and tenderness. Best of all, it can take a lot of guesswork out of that eternal question “Is it done yet?””

    tags: bs foods

  • “PixelCut today released PaintCode 2.1, adding support for the new Swift programming language to its popular developer tool. PaintCode is a unique vector drawing app that generates Objective-C or Swift code in real time, acting as a bridge between developers and graphic designers. With PaintCode, developers can create an app that is truly resolution-independent, using code (instead of a large number of image assets) to draw a user interface. PaintCode has been successfully adopted by numerous developers, including industry giants such as Apple, Disney Pixar, Twitter, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Evernote.”

    tags: bs swift

  • Google wants to be everywhere: In your home, your car and even on your wrist. That vision became increasingly clear at the search giant’s annual conference for software developers here on Wednesday. The company unveiled plans to expand Android, its mobile operating system, for new categories like wearable computers and automobiles.”

    tags: bs google android

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What I’m Reading on 06/23/2014

  • “Due to its early success and/or promise, Wink is about to become its own company, according to the New York Times. The company’s main technology is software that works like an operating system to connect all of your automated home devices. With the tap of Wink’s mobile app, a user is able to configure everything from a light that turns on when you walk in the door to security system settings. As a companion, Wink has just developed a hardware hub, so that devices that operate on Bluetooth, ZigBee and Z-Wave, rather than Wifi, can also connect to Wink.”

    tags: bs hub iot

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What I’m Reading on 06/20/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/19/2014

  • Apple isn’t upgrading the iMac family today, but it is making the family a little bigger. The company is now offering a new $1,099 entry-level model that includes most of the perks of the 21.5-inch model introduced last year—the same unibody aluminum enclosure, 1080p screen, port layout, 8GB of RAM, and 802.11ac Wi-Fi adapter—but takes a significant step backward with CPU and GPU speed.”

    tags: bs apple imac desktop

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What I’m Reading on 06/18/2014

  • Apple seeded iOS 8 beta 2 to registered developers today with a number of new features and stability enhancements. The new iOS 8 beta 2 build, labeled 12A4297e, marks the return of the dedicated Podcasts app and a Safari feature that blocks ads from automatically redirecting to the App Store. Safari also includes a new pinch to tab view.”

    tags: bs ios beta

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What I’m Reading on 06/17/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/13/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/11/2014

  • “If you own an iPhone and a Mac, Apple‘s new system for connecting the two is one of the best new features for OS X 10.10 Yosemite. True, Apple is years behind Google when it comes to making and taking phone calls from the computer, but its better-late-than-never approach gives the company two big advantages over Google’s system: the fact that it easily syncs with your phone, and that it’s part of a tightly-integrated system that goes beyond making calls.”

    tags: bs macs os x yosemite iphone

  • “In an exciting collaboration with Mozilla and Google, Intel is bringing SIMD to JavaScript. This makes it possible to develop new classes of compute-intensive applications such as games and media processing—all in JavaScript—without the need to rely on any native plugins or non-portable native code. SIMD.JS can run anywhere JavaScript runs. It will, however, run a lot faster and more power efficiently on the platforms that support SIMD. This includes both the client platforms (browsers and hybrid mobile HTML5 apps) as well as servers that run JavaScript, for example through the Node.js V8 engine.”

    tags: bs javascript simd graphics

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What I’m Reading on 06/10/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/09/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/07/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/06/2014

  • “This course is the first of a two-course sequence: Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python, and Introduction to Computational Thinking and Data Science. Together, they are designed to help people with no prior exposure to computer science or programming learn to think computationally and write programs to tackle useful problems. Some of the people taking the two courses will use them as a stepping stone to more advanced computer science courses, but for many it will be their first and last computer science courses.”

    tags: bs python programming mit

  • “The general consensus from developers appears to be that Swift is a great programming language. Swift is similar in many ways to Python, another highly-regarded programming language. Swift should be a much easier programming language for newcomers to pick up than Objective-C. Python is regularly used as the language of choice for programming classes, so many programmers may already be familiar with much of the Apple Swift syntax.”

    tags: bs swift python

  • “That’s where Swift comes in. Described as a fast and modern solution designed for safety, Swift is faster than Objective-C or Python and “allows a level of interactivity never before seen on the platform” thanks to its support for “playgrounds” that allow developers to visualize Swift code in real-time within the Xcode developer environment. That means developers are able to see what an app looks like before they’re even finished coding it.”

    tags: bs swift apple programming language

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What I’m Reading on 06/05/2014

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What I’m Reading on 06/03/2014

  • “Swift is a new programming language for creating iOS and OS X apps. Swift builds on the best of C and Objective-C, without the constraints of C compatibility. Swift adopts safe programming patterns and adds modern features to make programming easier, more flexible, and more fun. Swift’s clean slate, backed by the mature and much-loved Cocoa and Cocoa Touch frameworks, is an opportunity to reimagine how software development works.”

    tags: bs apple swift programming books

  • “Swift seems to get rid of Objective C’s reliance on defined pointers; instead, the compiler infers the variable type, just as many scripting languages do. At the same time, it provides modern features similar to those found in C++ and Java, like well-defined namespaces, generics, and operator overloading. From the few fragments of code shown during the demo, Swift appears to rely heavily on the dot-notation that Apple introduced in an earlier iteration of Objective C.”

    tags: bs apple swift programming language

  • “Apple took the wraps off of the latest version of OS X on Monday. In many ways, Yosemite is to Macs what iOS 7 was to iPhones and iPads—it didn’t drastically reinvent the Mac’s user interface, but its design is a fairly drastic break from the last decade or so of interface updates.”

    tags: bs desktop os x apple

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What I’m Reading on 05/28/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/27/2014

  • “There’s a new advantage to doing business in New York. A big one. START-UP NY, Governor Cuomo’s groundbreaking initiative, is transforming communities across the state into tax-free sites for new and expanding businesses. Now, businesses can operate 100% tax-free for 10 years. No income tax, business, corporate, state or local taxes, sales and property taxes, or franchise fees.”

    tags: bs startup ny

  • “This is a list of the best books for learning the python programming language.”

    tags: bs python books

  • “Memo to anyone who logs in to a WordPress.com-hosted blog from a public Wi-Fi connection or other unsecured network: It’s trivial for the script kiddie a few tables down to hijack your site even if it’s protected by two-factor authentication.”

    tags: bs wordpress

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What I’m Reading on 05/26/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/24/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/22/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/21/2014

  • “Atom, GitHub’s new open source text editor, was designed to steamroll over the old way of doing things. You use modern conveniences instead of fighting the text editor—for instance, you customize it with a graphical user interface (GUI)—so you can focus on your code alone. In short, it’s a text editor designed with beginners and amateur developers in mind.”

    tags: bs github atom editor

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What I’m Reading on 05/20/2014

  • “The power of wearables is to make the invisible visible. To show us what’s really happening around us. The last time I felt this way about a device was Fitbit. Seeing how you actually move during the day, versus what you think, is a profound realization, and Fitbit has motivated the world to move more and remember activity as the key to wellness. Perhaps the Clip’s power is similar. Perhaps through vivid memories and moments, we can become more present, more aware and yes, more happy.”

    tags: bs camera wearable

  • Microsoft Corp. MSFT -0.42% introduced a larger-screen version of one of its Surface tablet computers, offering a lighter and thinner device Microsoft touted as a potential replacement of existing laptops.”

    tags: bs microsoft surface tablet

  • “As virtual reality gains steam, the question of virtual worlds is never far behind. Philip Rosedale is best known for online community Second Life. But since last year, we’ve been watching for news on High Fidelity, a new project meant to blend his previous work with cutting-edge telepresence technology. The system, announced in 2013, was compared to the OASIS of Ready Player One: a series of worlds connected to each other by a central network and economy, provided — obviously — by Rosedale himself. At the Silicon Valley Virtual Reality Conference in Mountain View, we’re seeing the first hints of what that could mean, as well as a sense of the many hurdles left to jump.”

    tags: bs v inside fidelity

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What I’m Reading on 05/18/2014

  • “Some users who updated their Macs to OS 10.9.3 yesterday are reporting that their Users folder has disappeared. Like the name suggests, the Users folder holds all of the folders for a given computer, and something about yesterday’s update could cause it to hide itself for some.”

    tags: bs mac users folder

  • “And then there are the real fanatics – the Dylan obsessives who dig in the singer’s trash, buy the high chair he used as a baby and crash his sons’ bar mitzvahs. It’s those devotees who are the subject of The Dylanologists: Adventures in the Land of Bob, a new book by Pulitzer Prize–winner David Kinney examining the well worn legacy of rock & roll’s biggest enigma through the theories and fixations of his most devoted zealots.”

    tags: bs Bob Dylan music

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What I’m Reading on 05/16/2014

  • “The news today at Bloomberg  is that Rackspace has hired Morgan Stanley to look at “strategic options” for the future. Rackspace has long been something of a bridesmaid in the cloud infrastructure space. Previously dwarfed by the number one player, Amazon Web Services, the San Antonio-based company now has to contend with some very strong cloud infrastructure plays from others including Microsoft MSFT -1.54%, Google GOOGL -1.02% and IBM – all companies with far bigger footprints, and deeper pockets than it has.”

    tags: bs cloud

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What I’m Reading on 05/13/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/10/2014

iOS Development

General

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What I’m Reading on 05/02/2014

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What I’m Reading on 05/01/2014

  • “That’s all well and good, but hypervisor support takes up a lot of system resources — every VM runs not merely a full copy of an operating system, bur a virtual copy of all the hardware that operating system needs to run. That’s great for using otherwise unused memory or CPU cycles, but say you’re running multiple VMs and your users want more VMs — more I tell you! — then the fact that these fat VMs take up a lot of RAM and clock time starts to be troublesome. That’s where containers (a different take on virtualization) comes in.”

    tags: bs containers virtualization linux

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What I’m Reading on 04/27/2014

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APIs and SDKs for Wearables

Wearables are the hot new thing, though the market is still shaping up. Nike has already exited the hardware part of the business. Here are some public descriptions of APIs and SDKs for wearables that could be used for mobile apps or other applications. Some of the APIs may be for the phones/tablets, some might be for the wearables.

APIs and SDKs

What I’m Reading on 04/25/2014

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What I’m Reading on 04/24/2014

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What I’m Reading on 04/23/2014

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What I’m Reading on 04/21/2014

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What I’m Reading on 04/19/2014

  • “Johnny Depp, who’s built a brilliant career despite many of his lamentable film choices, may not be the first actor you think of to play a genius – much less humanity’s destroyer or savior. But he’s weirdly perfect in “Transcendence,” an inelegant, no doubt implausible (maybe not) science-fiction film about a futurist whose consciousness is uploaded onto the Internet. “

    tags: johnny depp transcendence nytimes bs

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What I’m Reading on 04/10/2014

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What I’m Reading on 04/05/2014

  • “For over eight years, ProgrammableWeb has served as the Web’s defacto journal of the API economy; offering news, advice, API directories, research data, and other information when it comes to the world of Internet-based APIs. Now, as a part of our continuing mission to serve as the world’s leading resource for developers, API providers and stakeholders, we’re announcing the the launch of ProgrammableWeb’s first-ever face-to-face conference; APIcon.”

    tags: bs api conference developers

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What I’m Reading on 04/04/2014

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