ODF News from Australia

See the ComputerWorld article by Howard Dahdah: “National Archives readies move to OpenDocument”. From the beginning of the article: The Digital Preservation team at the National Archives is looking to migrate its Xena preservation software to the new OpenDocument format with the next release of the software, in turn being…

Continue reading

Apache Tuscany

I’m not sure many people have heard of this, so I thought I would provide a pointer to the Tuscany project now under incubation in Apache. Here’s a blurb from the description there: Apache Tuscany provides runtime capabilities for applications built using a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Tuscany provides capabilities…

Continue reading

IBM is joining the V1 Technical Committee under INCITS to support ODF effort for ISO

There’s been a lot of press lately about Microsoft joining the V1 Technical Committee under INCITS and the group’s role in helping marshal the OpenDocument Format through ISO. It seems like such a good idea, that we’re going to do it as well. We are extremely optimistic about ODF becoming…

Continue reading

A dozen recommendations for corporate bloggers

I’ve been mentioned in a couple of recent blog entries (Jim Symcox’ “Does Blogging Get You More Sales?” and Fiona Torrance’s “Biz Blog Review recognized by IBM!”) about corporate blogging. Now that I’ve been doing this for almost 20 months, I thought I would provide a few comments on the…

Continue reading

IBM, Standards, Developers, China

Several weeks ago I mentioned that there was a new site on IBM developerWorks to help Russian developers get started with free and open source software. There is a new “Kick-start your Java apps” developerWorks site that makes it easy to get Eclipse, DB2 Express-C, and WebSphere Application Server Community…

Continue reading

Open Standards vs. Open Source, Part 3: Open Source Software

Part 1: Standards Part 2: Software Part 3: Open Source Software Part 4: The SOA Connection I want to jump to the punch line even before I make some definitions: open source software is something that you need to consider very seriously. This is true whether you are a user…

Continue reading

Blankenhorn on the public interest and standards

I think the title of this really should be about open standards rather than open source, but take a look at ZDNet’s Dana Blankenhorn’s blog entry “Open source and the public interest”. The really good bit is: Open standards offer opportunity to many businesses, while closed standards offer it to…

Continue reading

Writely, Google, O’Grady, and why I don’t really need or want a traditional word processor any more

Steve O’Grady of Redmonk has contributed another one of his fine Q&As, this time on the Writely acquisition by Google. I want to re-emphasize his last point of advice “… I’d love to see Writely continue to innovate in different directions; don’t try and be Word.”. I’m not picking on…

Continue reading

XForms 1.0 (Second Edition) is now a W3C Recommendation

The W3C has finalized its approval of the XForms 1.0 (Second Edition) Recommendation. The spec itself is here. This hasn’t hot the news media to any large degree, but it is nevertheless an important development. I suspect XForms will be a future standards battleground, though I think that it will…

Continue reading

Gary Edwards on what Google’s acquisition of Writely means

See Dan Farber’s reposting of Gary’s original comment to his ZDNet blog: “Writely = Microsoft’s Pearl Harbor?”. Gary brings the ODF connection into focus as well. David Berlind wonders who’s next on his blog: “On heels of Writely buy, what of INetWord, Zimbra, WikiCalc?”. Red Heering has an article that…

Continue reading