Setting up Ubuntu

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On my personal time, I’ve been playing with Ubuntu on the desktop. This is one of the most popular Linux distributions and it is part of the Debian family of distributions. From time to time I’m going to post about my experiences with this and other desktops and open source software on them. The disclaimer that I display on the website for this blog very much holds here: these opinions are my own and do not represent my employer�s (IBM) positions, strategies or opinions. In particular, any description of my experiences does not constitute in any way an official IBM recommendation.

A few weeks ago I first installed the Breezy Badger 5.10 distribution but yesterday I decided to be daring and put up the Beta 4 of the Dapper Drake 6.04 image. (You will note the interesting codenames for the versions.) The final distribution for Drake will be in June, a little bit later than their usual six month drop dates for new releases. I wanted to try out the beta because it had the latest version of Firefox as well as an updated Gnome.

There are two things I’ve always done first when setting things up: install Apache with PHP 5, and mount my Windows XP drive. There are multiple ways of doing these things. I’m going to list two ways that I have found and then I’ll continue talking about my experience in another post.

Installing Apache with PHP5

Do everything they say to do here but skip every module that mentions php4.

For example, where it says

sudo apt-get install php5-imap php5-syck php-pear php5-curl php5-dev php5-gd php5-ldap php5-mhash php5-mysql php5-odbc php5-recode php5-snmp php5-sqlite php5-xmlrpc php5-xsl php4-auth-pam php4-imagick php4-mcrypt php4-rrdtool php4-sqlite php4-curl php4-domxml php4-gd php4-imap php4-ldap php4-mcal php4-mhash php4-mysql php4-odbc php4-pear php4-xslt

you can just do

sudo apt-get install php5-imap php5-syck php-pear php5-curl php5-dev php5-gd php5-ldap php5-mhash php5-mysql php5-odbc php5-recode php5-snmp php5-sqlite php5-xmlrpc php5-xsl

Mounting your Windows NTFS drive so it is there when you boot up

This works for a dual boot system. Follow the instructions here. There is a guided way to do through the system menus, but this just works, so I do it.

This entry was written in the WordPress entry editor under Firefox while using Ubuntu.


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