Summer is over

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Though technically there’s a bit more than two weeks until Summer ends in the Northern Hemisphere, it’s over for all intents and purposes. In my family that means that school starts for someone. Up until this year it was both my daughter and son, but while my son started middle school today, my daughter has two more weeks until we bring her to start her first year of college.

I can also tell Summer is over because my travel schedule picks up significantly. I’ll be in Europe next week and this will cut into the time I can spend with my daughter before she goes off to school. That’s a shame, but I’ve not been away too much on business travel during the last few weeks. Also, I travel a lot through Chicago so I should be able to see her fairly frequently if I build a little extra time into my travel schedule.

She also feels that we can escape up to Hibbing once or two twice to reprise our trip in 2006 where we saw where Bob Dylan grew up. Unfortunately, Dylan Days in 2009 may conflict with her studying for finals. I need to work on that girl’s priorities.


2 Comments

  1. Speaking of Bob, I just finished reading Levon Helm’s book, This Wheel’s On Fire — http://www.amazon.com/This-Wheels-Fire-Levon-Story/dp/1556524056. You’ll learn a lot about Levon, Bob, The Band (Robbie Roberton, Rick Danko, Garth Hudson, Richard Manuel) and a wide assortment of interesting people, mostly musicians people involved in that business. It’s a very enjoyable story.

  2. If you go hang out on Jon Taplin’s blog, you can chat with people who were part of that. Jon was the executive producer of The Last Waltz.

    With the spirits of that period regurgitating through this one, you have an opportunity to find out which side you are on if any at all.

    Why is music such a weak force into day’s events when it was once a strong one? That question is being asked in a comment string become listserve (an evolution interesting in its own right) that Bob referenced, “cranky with the culture”.

    Us Vs Them: it’s not just a corporate strategy; it’s a symptom of a diseased culture, and of the faux enlightened. Just my opinion.

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