Daily Links 01/16/2009 (p.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.


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One Response to Daily Links 01/16/2009 (p.m.)

  1. Chris Ward says:

    I’m sure IBM Global Business Services Russia stands ready to sign a contract to help them in their project.

    Times change, and business changes with them. I remember stories from the 1980s of IBM Customer Engineers being based in Vienna, and providing service behind the “Iron Curtain” by special negotiation between the relevant governments. I also remember restrictions on which countries you could overnight in, when travelling on IBM business; I think it was somewhere around Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, or Finland; but don’t quote me.

    On the other topic, the thing about ‘licences’ reflects a divergence between the view of the salesman selling ‘boxed’ consumer software, and the realities of life on the wide open spaces of the public Internet. I guess it’s most sharply seen in the proposition that you can go into BestBuy (or any number of competitors) and pick up a copy of Microsoft Windows Vista for just a fistful of dollars, and then you take it home, plug it in, and find that three million of them have apparently contracted a ‘worm’ and are busily trying to spread it more widely.

    I’m not sure what the ‘worm’ is trying to do; but it certainly makes all the affected computers different from each other, and takes them a step away from being controlled by their nominal owner. And really, I don’t think the problem is Microsoft-specific; I think any popular software on a public network will suffer the same type of problem eventually; it’s just that this Microsoft product has the largest quantity ‘out there’ at the moment.

    How much of the $220 they get at ‘retail’ for each copy will Microsoft have to spend on remediation, in terms of employing software developers to find and fix whatever is going on, and in terms of distributing a resolution ? And what happens further down the pricing curve ? I’m fairly sure Lenovo won’t be paying anything like $220 per copy.

    Do you get to a point where the service cost to keep the thing under control rises above the revenue from the customer ? And if so, what does a business then do ?

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