Embedded programming languages

A long time ago when I first started at IBM I used an editor named XEDIT that ran under the VM/CMS operating system on mainframes. It was a fullscreen, line-oriented editor that looks primitive now but was quite sophisticated in its time. One of the best things about it was…

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Daily Links for Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Open Source Windows 7 on netbooks: Maybe it’s not a Linux killer ComputerWorld / Preston Gralla I’ve frequently written that Windows 7 will kill Linux on netbooks. But given that most Windows 7-equipped netbooks ship with the underwhelming Starter Edition, I may well have been wrong. And new evidence shows…

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Daily News for August 14 – Morning Edition

Linux and Netbooks Dell: Linux v Windows netbook returns a ‘non-issue’ The Register/Gavin Clark “Dell has delivered a dose of reality for both Microsoft and the Linux community on the subject of netbooks. Speaking at OpenSource World, a Dell executive deflated Microsoft’s enthusiasm for making a case out of the…

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Webcast: Migrating from Solaris to Red Hat Linux on IBM Systems

IBM will be hosting a webcast on said topic on Thursday, June 25, at 1 PM ET. The webcast description is: Interested in migrating from Solaris to Linux on IBM Systems, but concerned about technical gotchas in custom code and shell scripts? What you don’t know can matter, particularly when…

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Daily Links 01/14/2009 (p.m.)

Samuel J. Palmisano: Let’s Spend on Broadband and the Power Grid – WSJ.com “Smarter infrastructure is by far our best path to creating new jobs and stimulating growth. We at IBM were asked to map this out by President-elect Barack Obama’s transition team, and our research shows that a $30…

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Daily Links 12/10/2008 (a.m.)

Black Duck Dispels Top Five Open Source Myths “The third myth Black Duck sets out to dispel is that there are only a few billion lines of open source code out there. However, “This figure is an order of magnitude too low,” the Black Duck study said. “There are tens…

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Thinking about publishing

Lately I’ve been thinking about doing a writing project, possibly a book. This is not new, as I have this urge on a fairly regular basis. One thing that’s holding me back is that I’ve already been involved in two book publishing activities. The first was in 1991-92 when Dick…

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links for 2008-02-20

Politics Lessig: I’m considering a run for Congress | Tech news blog – CNET News.com “Confirming weeks of speculation, Larry Lessig, the Stanford University law professor and “free culture” icon, has confessed that yes indeed, he’s considering a run for the U.S. Congress this year.” (tags: politics) Free As In…

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links for 2007-05-19

Double the Standards, Double the Complexity Simon Phipps, SunMink: Message to Denmark: Dual Format Standards Are Bad “Having a single, baseline standard for document files is clearly preferable, and because of its complexity and the way it unfairly advantages Microsoft‘s existing products, OOXML is clearly a very poor choice for…

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links for 2007-05-12

Smorgasbord At USC, developing game coders | CNET News.com “USC’s video game programs have borne significant fruit, in large part because the school has made it clear to the industry, and to students interested in being part of the industry, that it is serious about being a world-class destination for…

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More Microsoft/ECMA troubles with ISO

Andy Updegrove talks in his new blog entry “OOXML and ISO: Fact and Fancy” of additional problems that Microsoft and ECMA are having trying to get something else blessed by the ISO, namely the C++/CLI proposal. Fast tracking isn’t necessarily fast and sometimes gets rejected. As I’ve said before, we’re…

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Will there be another Java?

This is the second version of this entry. In the first, I think I mentioned Java too often and in ways that opened myself up for criticism as a heretic, even though it wasn’t really my intention to find fault. This is especially true because the history of Java-the-phenomenon is…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 6

Before we go too much further, I want to show you a little bit of XML processing in Python. As we saw in Part 5, we can open up the content.xml component of our ODF file and retrieve the document. For a word processing document, this will include the text…

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links for 2006-09-02

PrettyPrinter.de, an online pretty printer for PHP, Java, C++, C, Perl, JavaScript, CSS (tags: php javascript programming) Microsoft tries to patent system ‘for selecting and conjugating a verb’ (tags: microsoft) OpenOffice goes Premium “Now, a group of OpenOffice enthusiasts have released OpenOffice Premium, a new bundle that includes the OpenOffice…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 1

There’s been so much talk over the last 18 months about ODF, the OpenDocument Format, that I decided that I wanted to take a look inside a file in that standard format. In particular, I wanted to take a very simple word processor document and see how it was saved…

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Reports from the Open Podcast: LinuxWorld Expo San Francisco 2006

With this entry I’m inaugurating a series of podcasts I’m calling “Reports from the Open.” These will be unscripted and probably somewhat rough recordings of some of my thoughts and doings around the world as I work with people on open technologies. This first podcast is about my experience getting…

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Apache Tuscany

I’m not sure many people have heard of this, so I thought I would provide a pointer to the Tuscany project now under incubation in Apache. Here’s a blurb from the description there: Apache Tuscany provides runtime capabilities for applications built using a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Tuscany provides capabilities…

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Open Standards vs. Open Source, Part 3: Open Source Software

Part 1: Standards Part 2: Software Part 3: Open Source Software Part 4: The SOA Connection I want to jump to the punch line even before I make some definitions: open source software is something that you need to consider very seriously. This is true whether you are a user…

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Regarding an ODF SDK

David Berlind asks over in his ZDNet blog where the SDK (Software Development Kit) is for OpenDocument. It’s a good question, so let me talk to it for a bit. I’ll also say up front that it is a good idea and it should be open source. We want everyone,…

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ECMA, ISO, Microsoft … but not ODF

In case you missed this a few days ago, here’s a tale of an ECMA effort that is now having trouble in ISO. Ars: “U.K. throws wrench in Microsoft’s C++/CLI plans”. Update: Andy Updegrove provides an update on this over at his ConsortiumInfo blog. We’ll see if this a mountain…

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OpenOffice and Java

Since I pointed to the original article mentioning the dispute, here is a follow-up from Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols at eWeek: “OpenOffice, Free-Software Supporters Make Peace over Java”. I didn’t know this until the article made me wonder about it, but there is a Python-UNO bridge for those who would rather…

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Stop with “XML Web Services” vs. “Java Web Services”

Ok, this is a rant. I get annoyed every time I see a reference to “Java Web Services” or “XML Web Services.” The latter was invented by Microsoft to ensure that people wouldn’t possibly associate a non-favored technology with the developing Web Services technology. Then Sun came back and started…

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