Robin Cover on “Massachusetts Releases Enterprise Technical Reference Model Version 3.0.”

Robin Cover has published an interesting discussion on what’s happening in Massachusetts with their new enterprise technical reference model. You can comment on the draft of the model until April 1. At the end of the article, Robin talks about the recent moves by Microsoft to open up their Office…

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I thought I knew what open meant

I’m in Brussels now to talk at the EICTA workshop called “Interoperability- achieving widespread access to new services and applications of the Information Society” tomorrow. It’s an important topic, but one that needs to be approached carefully to avoid misinformation and, in general, FUD. People in our industry have put…

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Some interoperability scenarios

To frame the discussion around interoperability, I thought it would be useful to work from some example scenarios. I’m not claiming that these are either exhaustive or non-overlapping, but since they represent common applications, they should be useful to fix some ideas. As we go along, we can add more…

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News: IETF standards organization appoints a new chairman, Brian Carpenter from IBM

The IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force) announced today that they have appointed a new chairman, IBM Distinguished Engineer Brian Carpenter. Congratulations Brian! The IETF describes itself in the following way: The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is a large open international community of network designers, operators, vendors, and researchers concerned…

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Interoperability: Enough Said?

For several weeks now I’ve been thinking about writing an entry on interoperability but for various reasons I did not. For example, I wanted to make sure I answered questions like: Isn’t all this stuff obvious? Do we need to talk about standards and interoperability explicitly because why would you…

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Links and comments for 13 February, 2005

Open-Source Practices for Biotechnology Food for thought, pun intended. Thanks to Mitch Kapor for the pointer. Programming Tools: Refactoring Interesting article on code refactoring features in Eclipse. They didn’t have this stuff around when I was doing serious coding 5+ years ago – it would have saved hours, if not…

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Is this tough love?

I’m confused. Did somebody miss a memo? How does this with the statement “Sun has always been an ardent believer in open standards and the open source process going back to the inception of this company” jive with the article “Father of Java chides open source developer community”?

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The Cover Pages: the primary resource for standards news and information

Every once one in a while, I ask myself “Gee, do people know about this?”. I just had one of those moments when I went over to Robin Cover’s site (The Cover Pages) at OASIS. I use this when I need to find all angles about a particular standards technology…

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On Standards, Part 1 of 1000

Since the beginning of the year I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about standards. This should be no surprise, since it is my job to do so. Nevertheless, it is important to get past the somewhat naive (for 2005) thought that amounts simply to “standards are good.” Surprisingly, this…

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My wishful predictions for 2005

For the last couple of years I’ve done Web services wish lists (2003 and 2004) and we’re already seeing the usual industry predictions for 2005. I thought I would combine them this year and offer some probabilities of their liklihood, a la Gartner. (Key: 0 = no chance, 1 =…

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IBM and WS-I

It’s now been more than two and a half years since IBM, Microsoft, and seven other companies announced the formation of the Web Services Interoperability Organization (WS-I.org). Our reasons for starting the organization were varied, but boiled down to a couple of basic notions: Because of the sheer breadth of…

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Stop with “XML Web Services” vs. “Java Web Services”

Ok, this is a rant. I get annoyed every time I see a reference to “Java Web Services” or “XML Web Services.” The latter was invented by Microsoft to ensure that people wouldn’t possibly associate a non-favored technology with the developing Web Services technology. Then Sun came back and started…

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Thinking about celebrating SOAP at 5 years (I know it is early)

Next April 26, SOAP turns 5 years old. Well, not the original SOAP, but SOAP 1.1 which really kicked off what I consider the Web services era. This is the version where IBM and Microsoft overhauled what had come before and, through our joint involvement, gave new focus to interoperable…

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