WhiteHouse.gov switches to open source Drupal content management system

Both the Associated Press and Dries Buytaert are reporting that WhiteHouse.gov has now switched to the open source Drupal content management system. Dries, the founder of Drupal is rather excited, as you can imagine, and says, in part: Being one of the world’s largest consumers of computer software, the U.S.…

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IBM’s patent announcement today

Today IBM announced that for the 16th year in a row, it received more US patents than any other company, The number for 2008 was also a record, 4186, for any company. Here are a couple of links to the story: New York Times: “Patent King I.B.M. Will Give Away…

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Managing open source adoption in your IT organization

This morning I was reading an article/blog entry by Paula Rooney called “Gartner doles out sobering predictions for open source use in the enterprise for next 5 years” over at ZDNet. In it, as you would expect, she largely quotes a Gartner report by Mark Driver. She says The economic…

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LinuxWorld 2008 Prediction #8: Industry applications

Although I’ve previously published the slides for the talk I gave at LinuxWorld 2008 in San Francisco, I thought it might be useful to add some additional comments in the blog about each of the eight predictions I made. This is not the full text of what I said nor…

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#1. If I were to build a virtual world … the basics

I’m going to start a new series where I publicly brainstorm about some issues of building a virtual world. This is just Bob thinking out loud, not some deep IBM strategy. I’m not even in the part of the company that manages the business we do do in virtual worlds.…

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Ten challenges and priorities for free and open source in 2008

Last week I started a series of blog entries about my personal view of challenges and priorities for this year. That first entry was about open standards and today I’m going to look at free and open source (FOSS). Incidentally, the first item on this list was on the previous…

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Southern California Linux Expo 6x – Call for Papers

I just got an email from Ilan Rabinovitch saying that the call for papers for the Southern California Linux Expo 6x ends tomorrow, Friday. You can learn more at their website, along with the descriptions of their programs on “Women In Open Source,” “Open Source Software in Education,” and “Demonstrating…

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New blog category design

Now that WordPress 2.3 supports tags as well as categories, I’m going to significantly reduce the number of categories that I use and then add tags to my entries. This will take some time, because there are now over 1900 entries in this blog. My scheme for coming up with…

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Interoperability Specifications Pledge

This morning IBM announced a broad patent pledge that covers over 150 of the core software interoperability standards. These standards had all been previously given royalty free licenses, but from a variety of sources at a variety of times. This action simplifies and makes more consistent the intellectual property situation…

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Video of “Virtual Worlds: Where Business, Society, Technology & Policy Converge”

Video from last Friday’s virtual world’s conference at MIT is now available in RealPlayer format. The links are available in the left-hand column of the agenda. In some cases, multiple sessions are contained in a single video segment.

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Challenging the knee-jerk use of .doc in education

I was pointed to this from SolidOffice. The article is “Critical Thinking About Word and .doc” in Kairosnews: A Weblog for Discussing Rhetoric, Technology and Pedagogy. It is must reading, in my opinion, if you just keep using .doc in education because you think everyone else does, and that’s just…

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My testimony to the Texas House and Senate regarding the open document format legislation

This is the text for the testimony I delivered to both the Texas House and Senate this last Monday, March 24. The words I said varied from this because of time constraints and also some additional comments supporting or questioning previous testimony.

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IBM, colleges, accessibility

See the IBM press release “IBM to Help Colleges Make Software More Accessible for Disabled and Aged”: NORTHRIDGE, CA–(MARKET WIRE)–Mar 23, 2007 — IBM (NYSE:IBM – News) today announced that it will work with academia to build a worldwide repository of materials that will enable student developers to make software…

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Blackboard sort of does a patent pledge

Today Blackboard, a company in the education and course management area, announced a patent pledge: Specifically, the Pledge commits Blackboard not to assert U.S. Patent No. 6,988,138 and many other pending patent applications against the development, use or distribution of open source software or home-grown course management systems anywhere in…

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Horizontal vs. vertical openness: what do you think?

Do people in the insurance industry use standards? Sure, they use things like XML, HTML, and the web services standards quite a bit. How about open source? We certainly have people using Linux in their datacenters and Eclipse to do software development. These are examples of “horizontal” deployment of open…

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Teach your children about open. Even better, show them.

I’ve been in Raleigh the last two days participating in the K-12 Open Technologies Summit at the William & Ida Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at North Carolina State University. It was quite intense but this wasn’t a group singalong where everybody was singing the same song. Sure, almost all…

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Dressing for breakfast

Sometimes I really wonder about myself (that’s not an excuse for you to comment). Today, Saturday, I am flying home from Oslo via London and Chicago. My flight from Norway was at 7:50 AM, and so I got up at 4 AM in order to catch the ‘FLYBUSSEN‘ (bus) to…

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Some Open Wishes for 2006

For those of us in the trenches, 2005 was an exciting if not exhausting year for standards and open source. We saw some important realignments in product categories, aggressive government examination and adoption of open standards, and some strong indications that the status quo around the interpretation of what “open”…

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ODF, XForms, Accessibility: Connecting the Dots

I’ve been meaning to point to the blog entry by David Berlind called “ODF subpar for the disabled? Not so fast says Google researcher” and add a comment. First, T.J. Raman was a colleague of mine when I was in IBM Research as well as later when I first moved…

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