I’m waiting

Every once in a while I realize that I’m waiting for something. Here are some of those things. I’m waiting for … The next release candidate of Ubuntu Linux 9.10. Fedora Linux 12. Winter. I know it’s coming, and I’m tired of being teased. The World Series, but only if…

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More thoughts on using WordPress for antisocial bookmarks

Several weeks ago I mentioned that I had stopped using Diigo for saving and then posting digests of links into this blog. Long before that, I had stopped using delicious for that functionality and switched to Diigo. The reasons I gave were: I don’t really need my saved bookmarks available…

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So you want to be an open source contributor?

I’m sometimes asked by people how they can participate in open source projects. Alternatively, I’m asked for support money by people who have very specific open source projects they want to do, but that’s another blog entry. If you have coding skills and want to use them to develop open…

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LaTeX revisited

Back in my math days before 1999 or so, I needed a document preparation system that could handle formulas and was programmable. That really meant one thing, TeX, or its somewhat easier to use set of extension packages, LaTeX. I did my doctoral dissertation using this and I did the…

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Thinking about publishing

Lately I’ve been thinking about doing a writing project, possibly a book. This is not new, as I have this urge on a fairly regular basis. One thing that’s holding me back is that I’ve already been involved in two book publishing activities. The first was in 1991-92 when Dick…

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Playing with the numbers, baseball and politics

Many diehard baseball fans love to play with the numbers, the statistics, associated with the game. One reason is that there are just so many of them, but the other is the hope that somehow they might predict the future for your favorite player or team. If you are into…

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Next week

Next week this blog will return to its regularly scheduled breadth of programming which has been interrupted for various reasons such as the expanding OOXML debacle, Summer, and other things. I hit the road on Sunday for Europe and will end the week in Poland at the 17th Economic Forum…

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Why OOXML will not be an ISO/IEC standard in 2007

Even though the JTC1 ballot closes on September 2 on Microsoft’s product description for Microsoft Office, namely OOXML or DIS 29500, this will not become an ISO/IEC standard in 2007. This most pointedly means: At this time, you should make no policy decisions based on OOXML becoming an ISO/IEC standard…

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No is no, to OOXML

I’ve heard several reports of supporters of OOXML trying to get national standards bodies to change their votes from “NO with comments” to “YES with comments” because “it’s the same thing.” The logic, which I’ll explain in a later post, is that any comments will trigger a ballot resolution meeting,…

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#3. My Favorites from 2006 – July through September

This is the third part of some reminiscences of my blogging experience from 2006. See the bottom for links to all four parts. “Adjusting to a more open world: Understanding and overcoming resistance to open technologies” Saturday, July 8th, 2006 This was, I think, a fairly good attempt at drawing…

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I’m a document guy

Occasionally I get asked why I really care about all the issues around OpenDocument Format (ODF), related standards in this area, office suites, and the shift to Office 2.0. I give the reasons that long time readers of this blog have seen before about real interoperability, innovation from community developed…

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Interoperability vs. intraoperability: your open choice

In mathematics the phrase “by abuse of terminology” is sometimes used in advanced books and lectures. There is no dishonesty intended, it’s just a simple way of saying “I’m omitting some of the details and it’s not quite exactly what I mean, but close enough for us to talk about.”…

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Microsoft: Please look like me (well, not all of you)

InformationWeek is reporting that Microsoft wants many other applications on all sorts of platforms to look like the forthcoming Office 2007 product suite. Microsoft on Tuesday announced a royalty-free licensing program so that outside developers can apply the Office 2007 interface to their own applications. There’s a catch, though:

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 6

Before we go too much further, I want to show you a little bit of XML processing in Python. As we saw in Part 5, we can open up the content.xml component of our ODF file and retrieve the document. For a word processing document, this will include the text…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 5

It’s been several weeks since I last wrote in this series of entries examining what is in an OpenDocument Format file via some Python programming. In that last entry, I examined what was in the manifest file in the ODF zipfile. In a subsequent short entry, I noted that Rob…

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Dr. ODF sidebar

While we’re waiting for Part 5 of the Dr. ODF series, I thought I would point out a connection between a recent blog entry by IBM’s Rob Weir and something we examined in Part 4. In his blog entry “A Demo: Mathematica, MathML and ODF,” Rob talks about how some…

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Making bad choices, over and over again

Over in his blog, IBM’s Rob Weir further delves into the underlying specifications Microsoft uses in their office XML spec and their almost pathological avoidance of accepted industry standards created by experts in what they are doing in ECMA. In this installment, “Math You Can’t Use”, Rob looks at how…

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