#1. Contradicting Microsoft Office Open XML

Microsoft and ECMA are now running the Microsoft Office Open XML specification through the ISO process and the first thing up is the contradiction period. This is the time when objections to the specification can be presented and then resolved, if possible. Here are two links to help you understand…

Continue reading

I’m a document guy

Occasionally I get asked why I really care about all the issues around OpenDocument Format (ODF), related standards in this area, office suites, and the shift to Office 2.0. I give the reasons that long time readers of this blog have seen before about real interoperability, innovation from community developed…

Continue reading

links for 2006-12-07

HTML, SVG, and MathML The Beginning of the End | Musings “Sam Ruby has been busy. He�s been lobbying for changes in the HTML5 Specification which will, ultimately, enable embedding of MathML and SVG in HTML5 documents.” (tags: mathml svg html) HOWTO Embed MathML and SVG into HTML4 This is…

Continue reading

Is Open XML a one way specification for most people?

I have been accused in the past of using a “weight” argument against the Open XML specification because it is several thousand pages long. While some people may think that is cute or funny, it is a real concern and is an obvious problem that programmers recognize. That is, it…

Continue reading

Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 6

Before we go too much further, I want to show you a little bit of XML processing in Python. As we saw in Part 5, we can open up the content.xml component of our ODF file and retrieve the document. For a word processing document, this will include the text…

Continue reading

Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 5

It’s been several weeks since I last wrote in this series of entries examining what is in an OpenDocument Format file via some Python programming. In that last entry, I examined what was in the manifest file in the ODF zipfile. In a subsequent short entry, I noted that Rob…

Continue reading

Dr. ODF sidebar

While we’re waiting for Part 5 of the Dr. ODF series, I thought I would point out a connection between a recent blog entry by IBM’s Rob Weir and something we examined in Part 4. In his blog entry “A Demo: Mathematica, MathML and ODF,” Rob talks about how some…

Continue reading

Making bad choices, over and over again

Over in his blog, IBM’s Rob Weir further delves into the underlying specifications Microsoft uses in their office XML spec and their almost pathological avoidance of accepted industry standards created by experts in what they are doing in ECMA. In this installment, “Math You Can’t Use”, Rob looks at how…

Continue reading

More on presentation software – look at Opera Show

Late last night I put up an entry asking where was the killer open source presentation software. Sam Hiser responded with a comment as did a couple of other people and Sam has a longer piece on his blog. Sam discussed Dave Raggett’s Slidy and also mentioned presentation support in…

Continue reading

Open Document Formats: “Open” must be more than a marketing term

I’ve been gearing up to write a piece about open document formats, and since I discussed the topic last Wednesday morning at the Open Forum Europe breakfast meeting in Brussels, I’ll go ahead and do it now. Simon Phipps was also on the panel and he also wrote up something.…

Continue reading