What does a cloud computing user want?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

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Who is the user for cloud computing?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

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LinuxWorld 2008 Prediction #5: SMB

Although I’ve previously published the slides for the talk I gave at LinuxWorld 2008 in San Francisco, I thought it might be useful to add some additional comments in the blog about each of the eight predictions I made. This is not the full text of what I said nor…

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Secure mashups via SMash

Some of my IBM colleagues in the emerging technologies asked me to mention something they introduced last week – SMash, for Secure Mashups. The basic idea is this. In Web 2.0 people frequently use AJAX components or services from several sources and then mash them together into a full application.…

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Monday morning: OOXML BRM tidbits

I’m in Geneva this week because I’m taking part in the Open Forum Europe conference “Standards and the Future of the Internet.” In addition, of course, the ISO/IEC OOXML Ballot Resolution Meeting is taking place this week. The OFE organizers have to gone to great pains to make it clear…

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#2. If I were to build a virtual world … building up the basic model

This is the second part of my series where I’m brainstorming about some considerations regarding building a virtual world. The idea is that I discuss what I would like to see in the world (or “worlds,” as I’ll talk about today), and give you the chance to tell me why…

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Thoughts on digital reputations

As a follow up to my comments at the Yale Law School Information Society Project Symposium on Reputation Economies in Cyberspace, I wanted to talk a bit about digital reputations. By this I mean some way of attaching numeric data and supporting information to a person, an object, a collection…

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Social networking and privacy

This is a big issue and though I don’t have any deep new observations about this, I want to share some thoughts from using Facebook for a few weeks. This isn’t necessarily Facebook-specific, but that’s a recent example for me. The basic problem is who gets to know what about…

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Question: Social networks and vertical industry standards

Here’s a question that I’m posing for discussion. Given the increasing capabilities of social networks like Facebook to network both people and their information, how should this affect the future development of standards within and between vertical industries? That is, we now tend to think of vertical industry standards in…

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Video of “Virtual Worlds: Where Business, Society, Technology & Policy Converge”

Video from last Friday’s virtual world’s conference at MIT is now available in RealPlayer format. The links are available in the left-hand column of the agenda. In some cases, multiple sessions are contained in a single video segment.

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Bluer skies, nicer clouds

Linden Lab, purveyors of Second Life, have announced the acquisition of Windward Mark, a graphics company specializing in atmospheric effects such as clouds and diffracted sunlight. This will both bolster their technology as well as beefing up their new presence in the Boston area. They have said that they will…

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IBM, Open Source, Health Care

This press release went out a couple of hours ago: IBM Brings Electronic Medical Records One Step Closer Through Open Technology; Contributes Technology to Open Source Community; Establishes Innovation Centers to Work with Major Players, Business Partners Here’s an excerpt: SAN JOSE, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Aug. 9, 2006–IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced…

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Open Standards vs. Open Source, Part 4: The SOA Connection

Part 1: Standards Part 2: Software Part 3: Open Source Software Part 4: The SOA Connection In the beginning, there was one computer and it was big and slow and it filled an entire room. Eventually, there were many computers and they were smaller and they could talk to each…

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Project Higgins

This morning I participated in the Project Higgins announcement held at the Tribeca Grill in lower Manhattan. It was a freezing cold day with biting winds, but inside the screening room we had some realistic and future-looking discussions about user-centric identity. Just the topic, I know you are thinking, that…

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Three words for openness: Transparency, Community, and Certainty

I’m in the middle of my beginning-of-the year heavy travel season and in the last three weeks I’ve been to Europe twice (five countries), San Francisco, and will have meetings in New York, Connecticut, and Washington, DC, this week. That’s hectic, but there is much more to say and talk…

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Open Standards vs. Open Source, Part 2: Software

Part 1: Standards Part 2: Software Part 3: Open Source Software Part 4: The SOA Connection In Part 1 of this discussion of open standards and open source, I focused on what a standard is and what it means for it to be open. I compared a standard to a…

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Ask your dog about the importance of standards

This article, “Is There Anyone Out There Who Can Read My Tag?”, ran a couple of days ago in the NY Times (registration required). It highlights the very real issues that can come about when established, proprietary standards come into conflict with international, open standards. The story runs more deeply…

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