8th Annual Southern California Linux Expo

I just saw notice of the 8th Annual Southern California Linux Expo now scheduled for February 19-21, 2010 at the Westin Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport. While I’ve never attended this conference in person (why be in LA in February when you can be in snowy upstate NY?), I’ve…

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Life with Linux: More apps

I’ve been working on tuning the Linux installation I have on my work Lenovo Thinkpad T400, and it’s time to add a few more applications. I’ll break them down by category. User Interface One feature I really like on OS X for the Mac is the ability to change the…

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Wiki thoughts

As long time readers may know, I’ve occasionally raised the spectre of adding a wiki to this website. Every few months I would look around at what was available, check out and install the famous ones like Mediawiki, as well as the smaller and less well known packages. Sometimes the…

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Open source and the lone developer

It occurred to be this morning when I was stuck in traffic that although a lot has been written about open source development for communities, much less is out there for the lone developer. This is the person who labors along by him- or herself, writing code and letting the…

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LinuxWorld 2008 Prediction #4: Linux and the desktop

Although I’ve previously published the slides for the talk I gave at LinuxWorld 2008 in San Francisco, I thought it might be useful to add some additional comments in the blog about each of the eight predictions I made. This is not the full text of what I said nor…

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#1. If I were to build a virtual world … the basics

I’m going to start a new series where I publicly brainstorm about some issues of building a virtual world. This is just Bob thinking out loud, not some deep IBM strategy. I’m not even in the part of the company that manages the business we do do in virtual worlds.…

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Up and running again

We’re back! My website sutor.com is now running on a new hosting provider and I think all the pieces are up and operational. The most time consuming aspect was uploading all the photos in the album. I’ve restored the WordPress database and it really couldn’t have been easier, given that…

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Disconnected

This week seems to have been a great big challenge in being disconnected, and not on purpose. I traveled down to North Carolina to give talks at NC State, UNC Chapel Hill, and UNC Charlotte. Aside from the normal running around doing things during the day, my Blackberry wasn’t pulling…

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Must read: “When is a standard not a standard?”

Sometimes I get lazy and just do a del.ici.us link to articles that really deserve more mention of their own, so I’m going to start making up for it by pointing you over to Edward Macnaghten’s excellent “When is a standard not a standard?” article at Free Software Magazine. There’s…

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#3. My Favorites from 2006 – July through September

This is the third part of some reminiscences of my blogging experience from 2006. See the bottom for links to all four parts. “Adjusting to a more open world: Understanding and overcoming resistance to open technologies” Saturday, July 8th, 2006 This was, I think, a fairly good attempt at drawing…

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On blog serialization

Attentive readers of this space will notice that I’ve slowed down the blogging for the end-of-year holidays and vacation. Tomorrow is Christmas, and preparation for that has been taking up a lot of our family time. William and I went to see Eragon yesterday and we enjoyed it. He and…

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My 2006 BOBBY Awards

It’s the end of the year and it’s time for my first annual BOBBY awards – Bob’s Open Blog Best of the Year. The categories and winners were chosen after careful consideration and all decisions of the judge (me) are final! My usual disclaimer: these are my personal choices and…

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How my website was built and how I might do it differently today

Effective January 1, 2010, this site does not use Drupal and instead uses only WordPress. It’s Saturday morning and I thought I would take a bit of time out to discuss how this website is built. It might be instructive for any of you who are thinking of doing something…

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Latest top 10 blog entries

About once a month I’m going to publish the top ten most directly read blog entries. By “directly read,” I mean entries where people take the trouble to visit the individual blog entry page. Many people, of course, never go to my website directly, they just use a feed reader…

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Will there be another Java?

This is the second version of this entry. In the first, I think I mentioned Java too often and in ways that opened myself up for criticism as a heretic, even though it wasn’t really my intention to find fault. This is especially true because the history of Java-the-phenomenon is…

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Top ten blog entries in the last two months

Here are the top ten most directly read blog entries since I started using Mint in September to measure stats: “Is Open XML a one way specification for most people?” (this has six times as many hits as #2) “The calendar according to Excel, or why Open XML is standardizing…

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Desktop Linux: It’s the wifi adapter, stupid

I’m the IT guy of the house. My 9 year old son’s computer started having some wireless problems several weeks ago. When I finally got around to looking at it, I realized that his hard drive was starting to fail. His old drive was 40Gb but I replaced it with…

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Regarding use of the Python code in my blog entries

Several of my blog entries in the “Dr. ODF” series use Python code to explore how to pull apart ODF files, learn about the contents, and then manipulate the contents. I was asked about the license for this code. This is important, but please remember that I intend this code…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 7

Last time I looked at a slightly more advanced document that added a bit of formatting to the basic one that only contained the letter ‘x’. In this part I’ll create a more advanced document. We’ll look at the XML in the ODF file and complete our basic examination of…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 6

Before we go too much further, I want to show you a little bit of XML processing in Python. As we saw in Part 5, we can open up the content.xml component of our ODF file and retrieve the document. For a word processing document, this will include the text…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 5

It’s been several weeks since I last wrote in this series of entries examining what is in an OpenDocument Format file via some Python programming. In that last entry, I examined what was in the manifest file in the ODF zipfile. In a subsequent short entry, I noted that Rob…

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ODF open source projects

Some colleagues and I were talking this morning and someone asked what open source ODF projects were going on at SourceForge. So we decided to take a look. Here are four searches where you can examine the same lists we saw for SourceForge and Google Code Projects: SourceForge search for…

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Dr. ODF sidebar

While we’re waiting for Part 5 of the Dr. ODF series, I thought I would point out a connection between a recent blog entry by IBM’s Rob Weir and something we examined in Part 4. In his blog entry “A Demo: Mathematica, MathML and ODF,” Rob talks about how some…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 4

Last time we got deeper into our OpenDocument Format text file and started using the documentation for the ODF standard to understand what should be in the document. We learned that there can be some variations in the internal structure between different documents. The information is saved in a zip…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 3

In this series of entries, I’m looking at how we can use Python to do some basic examination and processing of the contents of an OpenDocument Format, or ODF, word processing file. The document I’m looking at is almost as simple as it can be because it just contains the…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 2

In Part 1 of what I am calling the Dr. ODF project for examining what’s in an OpenDocument Format word processing file, I laid out our first big milestone: understand what is in the zip file holding the components of the document. Our initial document is very simple because I’ve…

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