What does a cloud computing user want?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

Continue reading

Who is the user for cloud computing?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

Continue reading

2009 Red Hat Virtual Experience

Just got a notice about the 2009 Red Hat Virtual Experience to be held on December 9. From the webpage: Join us December 9, 2009 for the Red Hat Virtual Experience, an event focused on Red Hat Enterprise Linux solutions, including virtualization and cloud computing. Attend in-depth sessions from your…

Continue reading

8th Annual Southern California Linux Expo

I just saw notice of the 8th Annual Southern California Linux Expo now scheduled for February 19-21, 2010 at the Westin Hotel near Los Angeles International Airport. While I’ve never attended this conference in person (why be in LA in February when you can be in snowy upstate NY?), I’ve…

Continue reading

No-cost office suites for the Mac

This article and something I saw earlier on the web today reminded me that not everyone is aware of office productivity suites for the Mac that are available for no cost. Microsoft grants Mac Office 11th-hour reprieve ComputerWorld / Gregg Keizer Just a day before Microsoft was to have retired…

Continue reading

Government and open source: Public interest

This week I’m going to pose a series of questions in the hope of driving some discussion around the use of open source in government, as well as government involvement in open source. (General warm-up question) In what ways is it in the public’s interest for a government to make…

Continue reading

When you choose your clouds, don’t make foggy choices

Whenever there is a major evolution in IT technology trends, the industry has a choice: do we go with proprietary data formats, protocols, and programming interfaces, or do we take a more open approach, allowing the provider with the best offering and service to win without locking in customers? Some…

Continue reading

Information Society Project at Yale Law School offers standards recommendations to Obama

Laura DeNardis, Executive Director of the Yale Law School Information Society Project, announced today that the group had sent a set of recommendations for open standards to the new Obama administration. In the announcement, Laura said The administration’s technology policy priorities create a moment of opportunity to rethink U.S. strategy…

Continue reading

Open source and the lone developer

It occurred to be this morning when I was stuck in traffic that although a lot has been written about open source development for communities, much less is out there for the lone developer. This is the person who labors along by him- or herself, writing code and letting the…

Continue reading

LinuxWorld 2008 Prediction #5: SMB

Although I’ve previously published the slides for the talk I gave at LinuxWorld 2008 in San Francisco, I thought it might be useful to add some additional comments in the blog about each of the eight predictions I made. This is not the full text of what I said nor…

Continue reading

Open source and piracy

Over at ZDNet, Dana Blankenhorn has a blog entry about whether software piracy benefits or hurts open source adoption. Evidently this originated from comments by Louis Suraez-Potts at OSCON noting that the availability of “free” (that is, pirated) proprietary software makes open source less necessary from a cost perspective. I’m…

Continue reading

Secure mashups via SMash

Some of my IBM colleagues in the emerging technologies asked me to mention something they introduced last week – SMash, for Secure Mashups. The basic idea is this. In Web 2.0 people frequently use AJAX components or services from several sources and then mash them together into a full application.…

Continue reading

#2. If I were to build a virtual world … building up the basic model

This is the second part of my series where I’m brainstorming about some considerations regarding building a virtual world. The idea is that I discuss what I would like to see in the world (or “worlds,” as I’ll talk about today), and give you the chance to tell me why…

Continue reading

Question: Social networks and vertical industry standards

Here’s a question that I’m posing for discussion. Given the increasing capabilities of social networks like Facebook to network both people and their information, how should this affect the future development of standards within and between vertical industries? That is, we now tend to think of vertical industry standards in…

Continue reading

Will virtual worlds save the standards process?

Packing. The drive to the airport. Getting through security and waiting for your plane. The flight(s), maybe on time. Taxis, cars, hotels, meals … Like the expenditures for other business trips, these are some of the real costs of developing standards. While a lot of standards work is done these…

Continue reading