What does a cloud computing user want?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

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Who is the user for cloud computing?

Several weeks ago I gave a talk called “Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops… and Linux” at LinuxCon in Portland (video, slides). Since then I’ve reprised parts of the talk several times, including a couple of times for IBM-only audiences. I’m going to put up a few blog entries that expand…

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Ten challenges and priorities for open standards in 2008

Over the next couple of weeks I plan to publish several entries on “challenges and priorities in 2008” on a range of topics, some related to work areas of interest, some related to personal ones. I’m kicking this off today with standards. In 2008, I think that we collectively should…

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Next week

Next week this blog will return to its regularly scheduled breadth of programming which has been interrupted for various reasons such as the expanding OOXML debacle, Summer, and other things. I hit the road on Sunday for Europe and will end the week in Poland at the 17th Economic Forum…

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SOA, healthcare, University of Florida, and IBM

A very nice story broke yesterday about work that IBM is doing with the University of Florida to enable patient medical devices to be treated as services. There have been several press write-ups: “IBM, University of Florida Team Up on Smart Devices: IBM and the University of Florida are working…

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#3. My virtual world requirements – World-to-world scenarios

In this series of entries (#1 and #2) I’ve been discussing my requirements for what I might consider the “ideal” virtual world for business, which I’ve mostly interpreted as “making Second Life better by adding or stealing features.” The purloined features, if you will, would come from other virtual worlds…

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Open standards and open source

It’s really quite amusing sometimes to hear how the “enemies of open” categorize the whole open source and open standards discussion. One of the tactics, which has the properties of being both wrong and misleading, is that we are confusing the two on purpose in order to break down proprietary…

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What business are we in?

Earlier today I was listening in on a meeting where one of our executives was making the point that people should stop thinking of themselves as being in the “open source software business” but rather just the “software business.” I want to riff on this a bit, but I want…

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#4. My Favorites from 2006 – October through December

This is the fourth part of some reminiscences of my blogging experience from 2006. See the bottom for links to all four parts. I didn’t blog much in the 10 days before and the few days after the November 7 election since I was volunteering on my wife Judith’s campaign…

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My 2006 BOBBY Awards

It’s the end of the year and it’s time for my first annual BOBBY awards – Bob’s Open Blog Best of the Year. The categories and winners were chosen after careful consideration and all decisions of the judge (me) are final! My usual disclaimer: these are my personal choices and…

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Latest top 10 blog entries

About once a month I’m going to publish the top ten most directly read blog entries. By “directly read,” I mean entries where people take the trouble to visit the individual blog entry page. Many people, of course, never go to my website directly, they just use a feed reader…

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Frontiers of Intellectual Property slide: “SOA accommodates both open and proprietary”

Another slide for discussion from my talk at the University of Texas School of Law: SOA accommodates both open and proprietary but only in the right places Service Oriented Architecture is the leading trend in building flexible, efficient, distributed computing systems. Open standards exist that allow services to communicate in…

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Top ten blog entries in the last two months

Here are the top ten most directly read blog entries since I started using Mint in September to measure stats: “Is Open XML a one way specification for most people?” (this has six times as many hits as #2) “The calendar according to Excel, or why Open XML is standardizing…

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IBM’s Ralph Hertlein joins the OAGi Board of Directors

As a further demonstration of IBM’s commitment to standards and industry, Ralph Hertlein has joined the Open Applications Group Board of Directors. I have a quote in the press release: “Ralph’s participation on the OAGi Board of Directors will help to achieve the goals IBM shares with one of the…

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Teach your children about open. Even better, show them.

I’ve been in Raleigh the last two days participating in the K-12 Open Technologies Summit at the William & Ida Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at North Carolina State University. It was quite intense but this wasn’t a group singalong where everybody was singing the same song. Sure, almost all…

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Interoperability and substitutability

One of the benefits of interoperability is substitutability: the ability to take one software application from one provider and put in its place another application from a possibly different provider. Open standards enable interoperability and hence substitutability. If I were an IT customer and I was looking at software, either…

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CNet article: “IBM plays XML card in effort to beat Oracle”

Normally I would just throw this into my del.icio.us links, but it hits so many of my topics that I wanted to call it out explicitly. The article, by Martin Lamonica of CNet is “IBM plays XML card in effort to beat Oracle” and starts out IBM is expected to…

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Remarks on the “Specs should lose weight, not gain it” entry

Wow, I’ve heard more about the “open XML diet” piece than anything else. I guess you all are waiting for the long weekend (US) to read the SOA entry (grin). Anyway, there is one really important item that David Berlind missed when he kicked off the discussion about MS and…

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Open Standards vs. Open Source series is complete

I just posted the fourth and final part, “The SOA Connection,” of the “Open Standards vs. Open Source” series. It took a while, but I finally got there. All the sections are now linked together. I’ve also put on my site a file with all four sections in one document.…

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Open Standards vs. Open Source, Part 4: The SOA Connection

Part 1: Standards Part 2: Software Part 3: Open Source Software Part 4: The SOA Connection In the beginning, there was one computer and it was big and slow and it filled an entire room. Eventually, there were many computers and they were smaller and they could talk to each…

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