Site statistics through September 30, 2009

Here are the rolling three month sutor.com site stats from Google Analytics, plus 12 month previous stats. Percentages are calculated with respect to total numbers of hits. Statistics are computed from the first to the last days of the months listed. The up and down arrows compare the latest month…

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Google still beating Bing, by a lot, plus other number games

Yesterday I was reading the article “Surprise: Open-Source Users Prefer Google to Microsoft Bing” by Clint Boulton. In it, Clint talks about Chitka ad network’s analysis of their traffic from search engines: The ad network compared the operating system and search engine data for more than 163 million searches and…

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IBM’s patent announcement today

Today IBM announced that for the 16th year in a row, it received more US patents than any other company, The number for 2008 was also a record, 4186, for any company. Here are a couple of links to the story: New York Times: “Patent King I.B.M. Will Give Away…

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My personal favorite posts for 2008

As we wind down down 2008 and head into the holidays, I’ve been doing some planning about blog posts and longer pieces I plan to write in 2009. As part of that, I decided to go back over 2008 and list some of favorite posts from this year. “Ten challenges…

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Playing with the numbers, baseball and politics

Many diehard baseball fans love to play with the numbers, the statistics, associated with the game. One reason is that there are just so many of them, but the other is the hope that somehow they might predict the future for your favorite player or team. If you are into…

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Almost November

I realized today that it’s been almost a week since I last did a non-news post here. There are several reasons for this. First, of course, I’ve been busy with work. Among other things, I’m preparing for my ten minute session at next week’s Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco.…

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The OOXML BRM: Secrets and statistics

I’ve provided a few links in another entry to some of the negative views from the ISO/IEC Ballot Resolution Meeting for Microsoft’s OOXML specification (via ECMA). For the most part, I’m letting others comment, especially those who were in the meeting. I expect we’ll be hearing a lot more in…

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Top Ten blog entries and some stats

It’s been a little while since I published statistics, so here are the top ten most directly read blog entries in the last month listed in descending order: “While you’re waiting, don’t save in OOXML format” “Toward vs. Towards” “Ten challenges and priorities for free and open source in 2008”…

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Position paper for Yale Law School Information Society panel

This is the “position paper” for the Reputation Economies in Cyberspace panel on which I’m participating tomorrow at Yale Law School. It makes a lot of assumptions about definitions (I’m on the fourth panel of the day) and just touches on some of the things on which I plan to…

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An “OOXML is a bad idea” blog entry compendium

I thought I would put together a list of some of my blog entries that touch on the OOXML issue now being considered in the JTC1 Fast Track Procedure. This isn’t everything I’ve ever written, but it includes most of the main points. I’ve also included a few related entries.…

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Top Ten blog entries and some stats

Since I started experiencing the “CPU Exceeded” problems several weeks ago, I moved off Mint and exclusively to Google Analytics for my website statistics. Therefore these popularity rankings and stats come from that new source. The top ten most read blog entries in the last month in decreasing order of…

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Up and running again

We’re back! My website sutor.com is now running on a new hosting provider and I think all the pieces are up and operational. The most time consuming aspect was uploading all the photos in the album. I’ve restored the WordPress database and it really couldn’t have been easier, given that…

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Latest top 10 blog entries

About once a month I’m going to publish the top ten most directly read blog entries. By “directly read,” I mean entries where people take the trouble to visit the individual blog entry page. Many people, of course, never go to my website directly, they just use a feed reader…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 7

Last time I looked at a slightly more advanced document that added a bit of formatting to the basic one that only contained the letter ‘x’. In this part I’ll create a more advanced document. We’ll look at the XML in the ODF file and complete our basic examination of…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 6

Before we go too much further, I want to show you a little bit of XML processing in Python. As we saw in Part 5, we can open up the content.xml component of our ODF file and retrieve the document. For a word processing document, this will include the text…

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What browsers are people using on sutor.com?

I’ve been trying out Mint for the last week to see some more statistics on how people are accessing my blog and overall website. It’s been helpful, though it tells me nothing about the use of the RSS and ATOM feeds. In the last week, here is the breakdown of…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 3

In this series of entries, I’m looking at how we can use Python to do some basic examination and processing of the contents of an OpenDocument Format, or ODF, word processing file. The document I’m looking at is almost as simple as it can be because it just contains the…

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Dr. ODF: Examining OpenDocument Format with Python, Part 2

In Part 1 of what I am calling the Dr. ODF project for examining what’s in an OpenDocument Format word processing file, I laid out our first big milestone: understand what is in the zip file holding the components of the document. Our initial document is very simple because I’ve…

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BREAKING NEWS: New patent initiative to increase quality, certainty

There’s breaking news this morning about a new 3-part patent quality initiative that we’re spearheading with the US Patent Office and others. Per the press release, the three parts are: Open Patent Review – a program that seeks to establish an open, collaborative community review within the patenting process to…

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Essay on Massachusetts and OpenDocument

I’ve referenced this before, but since it’s been updated, I’ll point to it again. David Wheeler has a good, comprehensive essay over at “Why OpenDocument Won (and Microsoft Office Open XML Didn’t)”. One point that you shouldn’t miss is around GPL. Microsoft has now said itself that its Office XML…

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